nun

(redirected from Female monasticism)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Female monasticism: monastic order

nun

a woman of a religious order: My teacher in Catholic school was a nun.
Not to be confused with:
no one – nobody: No one understands the problem.
none – not one; not any: None of them attended the event.; nothing: She looked for a reason but found none.; to no extent; no way

nun 1

 (nŭn)
n.
A woman who belongs to a religious order or congregation devoted to active service or meditation, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

[Middle English, from Old English nunne and from Old French nonne, both from Late Latin nonna, feminine of nonnus, tutor, monk.]

nun 2

 (no͝on)
n.
The 14th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. See Table at alphabet.

[Mishnaic Hebrew nûn, of Phoenician origin; see nwn in Semitic roots.]

nun

(nʌn)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a female member of a religious order
2. (Breeds) (sometimes capital) a variety of domestic fancy pigeon usually having a black-and-white plumage with a ridged peak or cowl of short white feathers
[Old English nunne, from Church Latin nonna, from Late Latin: form of address used for an elderly woman]
ˈnunlike adj

nun

(nʊn)
n
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the 14th letter in the Hebrew alphabet (נ or, at the end of a word, ן), transliterated as n

nun1

(nʌn)

n.
a woman who is a member of a religious order, esp. one bound by vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English nunne < Medieval Latin nonna, feminine of nonnus monk]
nun′like`, adj.

nun2

(nun, nʊn)

n.
the 14th letter of the Hebrew alphabet.
[1875–80; < Hebrew nūn literally, fish]

nun

- Derived from Latin nonna, the feminine of nonnus, "monk," originally a title given to an elderly person.
See also related terms for monk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nun - a woman religiousnun - a woman religious      
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Sister - (Roman Catholic Church) a title given to a nun (and used as a form of address); "the Sisters taught her to love God"
2.nun - a buoy resembling a conenun - a buoy resembling a cone    
buoy - bright-colored; a float attached by rope to the seabed to mark channels in a harbor or underwater hazards
3.nun - the 14th letter of the Hebrew alphabet
Hebraic alphabet, Hebrew alphabet, Hebrew script - a Semitic alphabet used since the 5th century BC for writing the Hebrew language (and later for writing Yiddish and Ladino)
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"

nun

noun sister, Bride of Christ He was taught by the Catholic nuns
Translations
رَاهِبَةٌراهِبَه
jeptiška
nonne
nunna
časna sestra
nunna
尼僧
수녀
moterų vienuolynasvienuolė
mūķene
mníška
nuna
nunna
แม่ชี
nữ tu sĩ

nun

[nʌn] Nmonja f, religiosa f
to become a nunhacerse monja, meterse (a) monja

nun

[ˈnʌn] nreligieuse f, sœur f
She's a nun → Elle est religieuse.

nun

nNonne f

nun

[nʌn] nsuora, monaca

nun

(nan) noun
a member of a female religious community.
ˈnunneryplural ˈnunneries noun
a house in which a group of nuns live; a convent.

nun

رَاهِبَةٌ jeptiška nonne Nonne μοναχή monja nunna nonne časna sestra suora 尼僧 수녀 non nonne zakonnica freira монахиня nunna แม่ชี rahibe nữ tu sĩ 修女

nun

n. monja, hermana religiosa.
References in periodicals archive ?
In cases such as female monasticism, international networks can be a necessary condition for the existence of Buddhist communities (Pichler).
Highlights this spring include a conference on 'Female Monasticism and the Arts across Europe ca.
But in view of the high level of learning that Kienzle finds implicit in Hildegard, and that scholars like Fiona Griffiths have been documenting in other female monasticism of the time, Hildegard's claims to base her interpretation of scripture on visionary authority begin to look like something closer to a mere expedient than we might have thought.
Close on the heels of Nancy Warren's terrific Spiritual Economies: Female Monasticism in Later Medieval England comes Women of God and Arms, a wide-ranging look at politics and female devotional practices in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century England, Spain, and France.
In texts with a positive image of convents and female monasticism, the mother superior is frequently depicted as the kindest and wisest of the nuns.
Nonetheless, Baernstein seems reluctant to tackle larger issues, such as how and why female monasticism became a defining feature of early modern Italy, or to use the convent's distinctive experience to open new angles of vision on significant social processes.