Fermat's last theorem

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Fer·mat's last theorem

 (fĕr-mäz′)
n.
The theorem that the equation an + bn = cn has no solutions in positive integers a, b, c if n is an integer greater than 2. It was stated as a marginal note by Pierre de Fermat around 1630 and not proved until 1994 by the British mathematician Andrew Wiles (born 1953).

Fermat's last theorem

(fɜːˈmæts)
n
(Mathematics) (in number theory) the hypothesis that the equation xn + yn = zn has no integral solutions for n greater than two

Fer·mat's last theorem

(fĕr-mäz′)
A theorem stating that the equation an + bn = cn has no solution if a, b, and c are positive integers and if n is an integer greater than 2. The theorem was first stated by the French mathematician Pierre de Fermat around 1630, but not proved until 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
He gives as examples some of the seminal ideas that arose in this manner, such as the resolution of the most famous mathematical problem of all time, the Fermat conjecture. Next, he takes a philosophical look at mathematics, pondering the ambiguity that he believes lies at its heart.