Fermat's last theorem

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Fer·mat's last theorem

 (fĕr-mäz′)
n.
The theorem that the equation an + bn = cn has no solutions in positive integers a, b, c if n is an integer greater than 2. It was stated as a marginal note by Pierre de Fermat around 1630 and not proved until 1994 by the British mathematician Andrew Wiles (born 1953).

Fermat's last theorem

(fɜːˈmæts)
n
(Mathematics) (in number theory) the hypothesis that the equation xn + yn = zn has no integral solutions for n greater than two

Fer·mat's last theorem

(fĕr-mäz′)
A theorem stating that the equation an + bn = cn has no solution if a, b, and c are positive integers and if n is an integer greater than 2. The theorem was first stated by the French mathematician Pierre de Fermat around 1630, but not proved until 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is one of the centerpieces of arithmetic geometry, And has in the past decades produced many spectacular breakthroughs, For example the proof of fermats last theorem by taylor and wiles.the most successful approach to prove instances of langlands conjectures is via algebraic geometry, By studying suitable moduli spaces such as shimura varieties.