Fermor


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Fermor

(ˈfɜːmɔː)
n
(Biography) Sir Patrick (Michael) Leigh. 1915–2011, British traveller and author, noted esp for the travel books A Time of Gifts (1977) and Between the Woods and the Water (1986)
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At half-past twelve next day Lord Henry Wotton strolled from Curzon Street over to the Albany to call on his uncle, Lord Fermor, a genial if somewhat rough-mannered old bachelor, whom the outside world called selfish because it derived no particular benefit from him, but who was considered generous by Society as he fed the people who amused him.
"Money, I suppose," said Lord Fermor, making a wry face.
Who is he?" asked Lord Fermor, knitting his bushy white eyebrows.
"I'll back English women against the world, Harry," said Lord Fermor, striking the table with his fist.
" The assets required for racing to take place at Towcester were sold to Fermor Land LLP, aompany linked to course chairman Lord Hesketh, in November last year.
Patrick Leigh Fermor had three of these four qualities, and the occasional pretentiousness of his voice in his books is quite absent from his private correspondence, a second trove of which has been collected by Adam Sisman in More Dashing.
He has been kind enough to sketch out two options: An eight-day tour with a close focus on Waugh, The Sword of Honour, and the Battle of Crete; and an eleven-day tour which also includes the other literature of wartime Crete (Xan Fielding, Patrick Leigh Fermor, William Moss, Dilys Powell), and the major Minoan site (Knossos) and museum (the Heraklion Archaeological Museum).
He writes of seasoned travelers (Patrick Leigh Fermor, Bruce Chatwin, Joseph Conrad, Herodotus himself), and writers as far flung as Omar Khayyam, Jamal al-Din al-Afghani, James Joyce, and Les Murray.
Visitor Patrick Leigh Fermor wrote: "There was a 'No dogs admitted' at the top of the stairs and 'Prepare to meet thy God' painted inside a wardrobe.