Coriolis effect

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Coriolis effect

Co·ri·o·lis effect

 (kôr′ē-ō′lĭs)
n.
The observed effect of the Coriolis force, especially the deflection of an object moving above the earth, rightward in the Northern Hemisphere and leftward in the Southern Hemisphere.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Co•ri•o′lis effect`

(ˌkɔr iˈoʊ lɪs)
n.
the deflection of a body in motion with respect to the earth as seen by an observer on the earth, attributed to a hypothetical force (Corio′lis force`) but actually caused by the earth's rotation.
[1965–70; after Gaspard German. Coriolis (d. 1843), French civil engineer]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Coriolis effect - (physics) an effect whereby a body moving in a rotating frame of reference experiences the Coriolis force acting perpendicular to the direction of motion and to the axis of rotation; on Earth the Coriolis effect deflects moving bodies to the right in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern hemisphere
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
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