ferromagnetism

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fer·ro·mag·net·ic

 (fĕr′ō-măg-nĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Of or characteristic of substances such as iron, nickel, or cobalt and various alloys that exhibit extremely high magnetic permeability, a characteristic saturation point, and magnetic hysteresis.

fer′ro·mag′ne·tism (-măg′nĭ-tĭz′əm) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ferromagnetism

(ˌfɛrəʊˈmæɡnɪˌtɪzəm)
n
(Minerals) the phenomenon exhibited by substances, such as iron, that have relative permeabilities much greater than unity and increasing magnetization with applied magnetizing field. Certain of these substances retain their magnetization in the absence of the applied field. The effect is caused by the alignment of electron spin in regions called domains. Compare diamagnetism, paramagnetism See also magnet, Curie-Weiss law
ferromagnetic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ferromagnetism

The magnetic property of cobalt, iron, nickel, and some alloys.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ferromagnetism - phenomenon exhibited by materials like iron (nickel or cobalt) that become magnetized in a magnetic field and retain their magnetism when the field is removed
magnetic attraction, magnetic force, magnetism - attraction for iron; associated with electric currents as well as magnets; characterized by fields of force
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ferromágnesesség
References in periodicals archive ?
Ferromagnetic interaction is cancelled out in BiFeO3 due to the spiral spin structure.
The manganese oxide not only showed a metallic conduction below Curie temperature Tc but also enhanced the ferromagnetic interaction when [La.sup.3+] ions are replaced with alkaline earth elements or also known as divalent metal ions ([Ca.sup.2+], [Sr.sup.2+], [Ba.sup.2+]) in perovskite oxide structures [5].