fescennine

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fes·cen·nine

 (fĕs′ə-nīn′, -nēn′)
adj.
Licentious; obscene.

[Latin Fescennīnus, of Fescennia, a town of ancient Etruria known for its licentious poetry.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Fescennine

(ˈfɛsɪˌnaɪn)
adj
rare scurrilous or obscene
[C17: from Latin Fescennīnus of Fescennia, a city in Etruria noted for the production of mocking or obscene verse]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fes•cen•nine

(ˈfɛs əˌnaɪn, -nɪn)

adj.
scurrilous; licentious; obscene: fescennine humor.
[1595–1605; < Latin Fescennīnus of, belonging to Fescennia, a town in Etruria noted for jesting and scurrilous verse]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

Fescennine

adjective
Offensive to accepted standards of decency:
Slang: raunchy.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Highly formal and often quite formulaic--George Puttenham's Art of English Poesie (1689) and Julius Caesar Scaliger's Poetices libri septem (1561) provided guidelines for conventional composition--epithalamia usually praise the beauty and character of bride and bridegroom, talk about t heir families, and celebrate unity, stability, and harmony, sometimes incorporating traditional fescennine verses designed to ward off evil by poking fun at it, and invariably ending with blessings and benedictions.
Fescennine verses included in marriage poetry are often bawdy and always represent an awareness of the potential dangers in marriage, sometimes sexual, sometimes political, sometimes simply any kind of threat to peace and security.
Fescennine verse , Latin Fescennini versus, also called carmina Fescennina.