fiefdom

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Related to Feudum: fief

fief·dom

 (fēf′dəm)
n.
1. The estate or domain of a feudal lord.
2. An organization or department over which one dominant person or group exercises control.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fiefdom

(ˈfiːfdəm)
n
1. (in feudal Europe) the property owned by a lord
2. an area over which a person or organization exerts authority or influence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fief•dom

(ˈfif dəm)

n.
1. the estate or domain of a feudal lord.
2. anything owned by one dominant person or group.
[1805–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fiefdom

Medieval History. the land over which a person exercises control after vows of vassalage and service to an overlord. See feudalism.
See also: Land
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiefdom - the domain controlled by a feudal lord
demesne, domain, land - territory over which rule or control is exercised; "his domain extended into Europe"; "he made it the law of the land"
2.fiefdom - an organization that is controlled by a dominant person or group
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

fiefdom

[ˈfiːfdəm] Nfeudo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(18) "The term fee comes from the Latin feudum or feodum,
In the early writings of Medieval Latin Europe it has been explained that a land is granted in exchange for services which is called beneficium' but later it became feudum or feodum (feudalism).1Moreover the term of feudum' or feodum' was used in different languages of Europe in different times as it first entered in the French language in 1823 in Italian in 1827 inEnglish in 1839 and in German in the second half of the 19th century.2
The definition of allodium is: "An estate held in absolute ownership without service or acknowledgement of any superior, as among the early Teutonic people; opposed to feudum or feud," and the first citation is from the year 1628.
She finds that the terms vassus and feudum were most often used imprecisely except by law professors, and she contends that the model based on academic feudal law hinders our understanding of the phenomena to which nonacademics applied these terms or their supposed equivalents.