Feuillant


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Related to Feuillant: Girondins, Cordeliers, Jacobins, Cordeliers Club

Feuillant

(fœjɑ̃)
n
(Historical Terms) French history a member of a club formed in 1791 by Lafayette advocating a limited constitutional monarchy: forced to disband in 1792 as the revolution became more violent and antimonarchical
[from the convent of Notre Dame des Feuillants, where meetings were held]

Feuillant

(in France) a member of a club of constitutional monarchists, named after their meeting place at Notre Dame des Feuillants.
See also: Politics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: cleaning services for the premises and glazing of the feuillant palace of justice in poitiers reference number: cleaning-pj-poitiers-2019
Alors en voyant ce livre et meme en feuillant ses feuilles, il m'a prie de le lui offrir en echange de cinq livres d'un autre auteur celebre dont le nom est Mustapha Lotfi El Manfalouti.
Otra caricatura, en esta ocasion antirrevolucionaria, nos ilustra sobre su idea de lo que debe hacerse con los jacobinos y los escritores, ahorcarlos: Pas de deux entre un Jacobin et un Feuillant (s.a., Paris, Collection de Vinck) (5).
(47) Barnave, letter to Alexandre de Lameth, 4 avril 1792, in Georges Michon, Essai sur l"histoire du parti feuillant: Adrien Duport; [avec] correspondence inedite de Barnave en 1792 (Paris, 1924), pp.
Contract notice: Renovation of tgbt "art and feuillant" from the louvre museum.
This omission is all the more regrettable because he mentions numerous kinds of Jacobinism, including progressive, Orthodox, High, and pre-Jacobinism, alongside the more well-known types: Feuillant, Girdondist, and Montagnard.
Consequently patriots in 1789 were "potential Jacobins." Most leading revolutionaries were linked at some point with the Paris Club or one of its affiliates, but to include all factions within the general designation of Jacobinism Higonnet must employ qualifying labels such as "Feuillant Jacobins," "Girondist Jacobins," and "Montagnard Jacobins" which downplay philosophical and political differences.
In exploring these alternatives, Sonenscher rewrites the political history of the early Revolution, interpreting both the Feuillants and Girondins as driven by a concern to establish a new system of credit that would underpin a new kind of state.