Feynman diagram


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Feynman diagram

n.
A diagram used in quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics to help describe and visualize the possible interactions between particles. Fermions are represented with straight lines, and bosons with wavy lines. Points of intersection indicate an interaction between the particles.

[After Richard Phillips Feynman.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Feynman diagram

(ˈfaɪnmən)
n
(General Physics) physics a graphical representation of the interactions between elementary particles
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
It presents a detailed derivation of the Feynman diagram technique and discusses the method of functional integrals in quantum theory.
1: The Feynman diagram for the propagation of the electron core (-[e.sub.*], m) from (x, t) to (x', t') with no external scattering.
The Feynman diagram is the most popular method for representing the terms in perturbative expressions.
There does not seem to be much to make of the shape of the constellation's major stars except perhaps a 'Y' or maybe a sort of Feynman diagram.
The theory gave consistent answers to physical problems that the old theory could not and introduced the pioneering "Feynman diagram," an aid to calculation that soon after became widely used.
A review of QED in the scientific journal Nature put it succinctly: "We get 40 seconds of a Feynman diagram scrawled on that blackboard as a gee-whiz illustration ...
M38 has a fairly distinct cross shape, though some observers liken the shape to the Greek character for Pi, or possibly more like a Feynman diagram to my eye.
gives the vertex factor (-ie)[(p.sub.E] + [q.sub.E]) which corresponds to the usual vertex of Feynman diagram with two electron straight lines (with energies [p.sub.E] and [q.sub.E]) and one photon wave line in the conventional QED.
Although inscrutable to the uninitiated, a typical Feynman diagram looks simple.
Feynman diagrams for the subprocesses [mu]q([bar.q]) [right arrow] [[mu].sup.*]q([bar.q]) are shown in Figure 2.