Feynman diagram

(redirected from Feynman diagrams)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.
Related to Feynman diagrams: Richard Feynman

Feynman diagram

n.
A diagram used in quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics to help describe and visualize the possible interactions between particles. Fermions are represented with straight lines, and bosons with wavy lines. Points of intersection indicate an interaction between the particles.

[After Richard Phillips Feynman.]

Feynman diagram

(ˈfaɪnmən)
n
(General Physics) physics a graphical representation of the interactions between elementary particles
References in periodicals archive ?
They cover an overview of geometry and physics, spin systems for mathematicians, the Arf-Brown topological quantum field theory of pin(su)- surfaces, a guide for computing stable homotopy groups, flagged higher categories, how to derive Feynman diagrams for finite-dimensional integrals directly from the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, homotopy RG flow and the non-linear s-model, and the holomorphic bosonic string.
The representations of these scatterings in Figures 1-4 are called Feynman diagrams [7, eqn.
Feynman diagrams for the subprocesses [mu]q([bar.q]) [right arrow] [[mu].sup.*]q([bar.q]) are shown in Figure 2.
During the Second World War he completed his doctorate on the principle of least action in quantum mechanics, from which later came his formulation of the path integral and his powerful Feynman diagrams, and he worked on the Manhatten Project which produced the first atomic bomb.
In the 1992 edition of his book A Guide to Feynman Diagrams in the Many-Body Problem, physicist Richard Mattuck compares the dilemma to trying to describe a galloping horse and all the grains of dust that it kicks up.
Mattuch, Guide to Feynman Diagrams in the ManyBody Problem, McGraw-Hill, NewYork, NY, USA, 1976.
Anyone interested in the development of theoretical physics in the last 60 years, be they a physicist, a philosopher or a historian, will have encountered Feynman diagrams, the schematic stick figure depictions of scattering processes and interactions used for calculations in a variety of physical sub-disciplines, from high energy particles to condensed matter.
He also created "Feynman diagrams," simple schematic sketches whose lines revealed how subatomic particles behave or how numerical and symbolic formulas appear in space/time.
It explains the basic physics and formalism of the theory, helps students become proficient in perturbation theory calculations using Feynman diagrams, and introduces gauge theories that are playing a central role in elementary particle physics.
Perhaps the finest grained evidence here comes from the work of David Kaiser, who has traced the flow of ideas among physicists, looking at the development, mutations, and spread of Feynman diagrams. Using these diagrams, which illustrate interactions between particles, he shows how interacting communities modify and define techniques.