Fibiger


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Fibiger

(Danish ˈfibiɡər)
n
(Biography) Johannes Andreas Grib (joˈhanəs anˈdreːas ɡrɪb). 1867–1928, Danish physician: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1926) for his work in cancer research
References in periodicals archive ?
As others have discussed, however, it is not easy to predict how pretreatment with that d tug will affect self-administration (Bardo & Bevins, 2000; Bozarth, 1987; Carr, Fibiger, & Phillips, 1989; Swerdlow, Gilbert, & Koob, 1989; Tzschentke, 1998; van der Kooy, 1987).
38) One source for information on laws and regulations regarding archaeological excavation of human remains is Marquez-Grant, Nicholas, and Linda Fibiger, The Routledge Handbook of Archaeological Human Remains and Legislation: An International Guide to Laws and Practice in the Excavation and Treatment of Archaeological Human Remains (Routledge, 2011).
Both in North America and globally (Marquez-Grant and Fibiger 2011), bioarchaeology is forging a new commitment to how we engage with repatriation (Kakaliouras 2012, 2017; Perez 2010) and ethical practice with community stakeholders and the public (Martin et al.
Johannes Fibiger was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1926 "for his discovery of the Spiroptera carcinoma.
Sherman, Goat Medicine, Lea and Fibiger, Philadelphia, Pa, USA; Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2nd edition, 2009.
For this model as applied to the Timurid dynasty, see Beatrice Forbes Manz, Power, Politics and Religion, 2; and, in general, Peter Fibiger Bang, "Lord of All the World: The State, Heterogeneous Power and Hegemony in the Roman and Mughal Empires," in Bang and Bayly, eds, Tributary Empires, 171-92.
In fact Andreas Grib Fibiger (1867 1928) was awarded the 1926 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of the cancer causing nematode' Spiroptera carcinoma.
Today, the wasp moths are included in the Noctuoidea: Erebidae: Arctiinae: Arctiini and have been divided into 2 subtribes Ctenuchina y Euchromiina (Lafontaine & Fibiger 2006; Lafontaine & Schmidt 2010; Zahiri et al.
1998) como asi tambien en la exposicion a sonidos o luces (Acquas, Wilson & Fibiger, 1996) o sabores (Miranda, RamirezLugo & Bermudez-Rattoni, 2000).
No es posible determinar si su origen fue accidental o intencional, pero se enmarca dentro del cada vez mas numeroso registro neolitico europeo que pone de manifiesto tanto la existencia de violencia interpersonal --con conocidos ejemplos en Asparn-Schl o Talheim--como la realizacion de practicas de manipulacion de cadaveres--identificadas en Herxheim o Fontbregoua--(Schulting y Fibiger, 2012; Stecher et al.