Fibiger


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Fibiger

(Danish ˈfibiɡər)
n
(Biography) Johannes Andreas Grib (joˈhanəs anˈdreːas ɡrɪb). 1867–1928, Danish physician: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1926) for his work in cancer research
References in periodicals archive ?
Fibiger, "Organization of central cholinergic systems," Progress in Brain Research, vol.
In The Cambridge World History of Violence, edited by Linda Fibiger, Philip G.
As others have discussed, however, it is not easy to predict how pretreatment with that d tug will affect self-administration (Bardo & Bevins, 2000; Bozarth, 1987; Carr, Fibiger, & Phillips, 1989; Swerdlow, Gilbert, & Koob, 1989; Tzschentke, 1998; van der Kooy, 1987).
(38) One source for information on laws and regulations regarding archaeological excavation of human remains is Marquez-Grant, Nicholas, and Linda Fibiger, The Routledge Handbook of Archaeological Human Remains and Legislation: An International Guide to Laws and Practice in the Excavation and Treatment of Archaeological Human Remains (Routledge, 2011).
Fibiger, "Dopaminergic-cholinergic interactions in the striatum," The Japanese Journal of Psychiatry and Neurology, vol.
For instance, Fibiger and colleagues [71] reported higher cardiac output during a mental arithmetic task.
Johannes Fibiger was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1926 "for his discovery of the Spiroptera carcinoma." (4) Ephedrine was identified as useful for "the treatment of asthma, local nasal conditions, hay fever and possibly low blood pressure in shock, but it [was] very expensive." (5) Pasteurization, which became widespread only a decade earlier, "...
Sherman, Goat Medicine, Lea and Fibiger, Philadelphia, Pa, USA; Wiley-Blackwell, Hoboken, NJ, USA, 2nd edition, 2009.
(14.) For this model as applied to the Timurid dynasty, see Beatrice Forbes Manz, Power, Politics and Religion, 2; and, in general, Peter Fibiger Bang, "Lord of All the World: The State, Heterogeneous Power and Hegemony in the Roman and Mughal Empires," in Bang and Bayly, eds, Tributary Empires, 171-92.
In fact Andreas Grib Fibiger (1867 1928) was awarded the 1926 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of the cancer causing nematode' Spiroptera carcinoma.