Ficino


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Ficino

(Italian fiˈtʃiːno)
n
(Biography) Marsilio (marˈsiːlio). 1433–99, Italian Neoplatonist philosopher: attempted to integrate Platonism with Christianity
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Among the topics are Virgil and Renaissance rhetorical theory, Virgilian imagery and the Maiolica of the Mantuan court, Virgilian quotations on medals and token issued in the Low Countries during the second half of the 16th century, re-evaluating Turnus: multiple voices in Vegio's Supplement, Aeneas interpres: Landino's earliest allegory of the Aeneid and Ficino's first ten dialogues, and Virgil and the idea of a renaissance.
Although the period primarily relied on humoural medicine to understand the body's emotional and physical health, early moderns, including Neoplatonists such as Marsilio Ficino, turned to hidden antipathies and sympathies to explain 'both bonds and animosities among an unpredictable mix of plants, minerals, animals, and humans'.
Transcendence of the sort practiced by Plotinus and early Christianera Hermetists was revived and given new impetus by fifteenth-century philosopher Marsilio Ficino with his Latin translations of and commentaries on those authors.
This study identifies an allegorical representation of the polemic between vernacular poet Luigi Pulci and Neoplatonic philosopher Marsilio Ficino within Pulci's epic poem Il Morgante.
Modelli di episteme neoplatonica nella Firenze del '400: legnoseologie di Giovanni Pico della Mirandola e di Marsilio Ficino. Simone Fellina.
We recognize too that his sequence of questions proceeds from the problematics of decorous speech to the problematics of decorous desire; specifically, to his wavering between what Ficino, Pico, and Castiglione would designate as contradictory ways of loving, as loving either honourably (5-6) or dishonourably (7-8).
In the early Renaissance, this noble family promoted Dante's Divine Comedy and corresponded with Marsilio Ficino, the Neoplatonic philosopher (Salaman 77-78).