fictitious force

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fictitious force

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In many technical problems, where appear plane plates having rotation motion, the solving of the problem of determination of the reactions is simple if is known the position of the support of resultant vector of d'Alembert's fictitious forces system.
In this paper are proposed a rule for the determination of the support of the resultant vector of the d'Alembert's fictitious forces for plates having uniform rotation motion and a formula for calculus of the centrifugal moment for plane plates.
THE SUPPORT OF THE RESULTANT VECTOR OF THE D'ALEMBERT FICTITIOUS FORCES SYSTEM
It follows that the system of d'Alembert's fictitious forces is a parallel forces system and can be replaced by the resultant vector.
Because the plate is entirely situated on the same side of the rotation axis, all the d'Alembert's fictitious forces have the same sign.
As spoken of by contemporary physicists, inertial or fictitious forces, though related to Newton's vis inertiae, do not have exactly the same meaning, though for both, a body's inertia is acknowledged as a true source of the phenomena under consideration.
Christiaan Huygens, Newton's great contemporary, developed an unsuccessful relativistic physics that sought to eliminate fictitious forces, especially centrifugal "force.
58) Mach argued that inertial or fictitious forces are caused by the distant matter of the universe and that if the background of fixed stars did not exist, there would be no inertial forces.
Fictitious forces are distinguished from 'actual' forces by the fact that the fictitious forces depend only on the motion .
The package, considered as being pressed into the passenger's stomach by a fictitious force, does not react (via Newton's Third Law of Motion, action and reaction) upon the source of the fictitious force, for no such source exists.
Besides the difference in metaphysics, the alternative to Newton's second law given by equation (26) offers an advantage in resolving some philosophical issues regarding the foundations of Classical Mechanics and in particular the need to consider fictitious forces when applying Newton's Second Law in non-inertial reference frames.
Since such fictitious forces are always orthogonal to the velocity of a particle in motion, for rotating observers it turns out that the time rate of change of kinetic energy of the particle is equal to zero, as obtained by equation (1).