Ficus deltoidea


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Noun1.Ficus deltoidea - shrub or small tree often grown as a houseplant having foliage like mistletoeFicus deltoidea - shrub or small tree often grown as a houseplant having foliage like mistletoe
fig tree - any moraceous tree of the tropical genus Ficus; produces a closed pear-shaped receptacle that becomes fleshy and edible when mature
References in periodicals archive ?
Ali, "Anti-inflammatory activity of standardised extracts of leaves of three varieties of Ficus deltoidea," International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, vol.
Ficus deltoidea (FD), known as "Mas Cotek" in Malaysia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various kinds of ailments such as sores, wounds, pain, and rheumatism [11].
A similar mechanism has been proposed for antinociceptive activity of Ficus deltoidea Jack (Moraceae) aqueous extract in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model (Sulaiman et al., 2008), and this can also be the mechanism operating in the present study.
Ficus deltoidea (or commonly known as mistletoe fig) in various parts of the world mainly serves as an ornamental shrub or houseplant and found native mainly in Asia tropical region for example Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand (Starr, 2003; United States Department of Agriculture, 1996).
Lollipop leaves, decorative fruits, and angular branching make mistletoe fig (Ficus deltoidea, often sold as F.
It is noteworthy that a similar mechanism has been proposed for antinociceptive activity of Ficus deltoidea Jack (Moraceae) aqueous extract in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model [49].
Notably, a similar mechanism has been proposed for antinociceptive activity of Ficus deltoidea Jack (Moraceae) aqueous extract in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model (Sulaiman et al., 2008), and this may also be the mechanism operating in the present study.
It is noteworthy that a similar mechanism has been proposed for antinociceptive activity of Ficus deltoidea Jack (Moraceae) aqueous extract in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model (Sulaiman et al., 2008), and this can also be the mechanism operating in the present study.