fortification

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Related to Field fortification: Military fortification, Fortresses

for·ti·fi·ca·tion

 (fôr′tə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The science of fortifying.
b. The act or process of fortifying.
2. Something that serves to fortify, especially military works erected to fortify a position or place.

fortification

(ˌfɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. the act, art, or science of fortifying or strengthening
2. (Fortifications)
a. a wall, mound, etc, used to fortify a place
b. such works collectively
3. (Fortifications) any place that can be militarily defended

for•ti•fi•ca•tion

(ˌfɔr tə fɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process or act of fortifying.
2. something that fortifies or protects.
3. Often, fortifications. military works constructed in order to defend or strengthen a position.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fortification - defensive structure consisting of walls or mounds built around a stronghold to strengthen itfortification - defensive structure consisting of walls or mounds built around a stronghold to strengthen it
bastion - projecting part of a rampart or other fortification
bunker, dugout - a fortification of earth; mostly or entirely below ground
castle - a large building formerly occupied by a ruler and fortified against attack
defensive structure, defence, defense - a structure used to defend against attack; "the artillery battered down the defenses"
defilade - the arrangement of defensive fortifications to protect against enemy fire
entrenchment, intrenchment - an entrenched fortification; a position protected by trenches
escarp, protective embankment, scarp, escarpment - a steep artificial slope in front of a fortification
fieldwork - a temporary fortification built by troops in the field
lunette - temporary fortification like a detached bastion
palisade - fortification consisting of a strong fence made of stakes driven into the ground
breastwork, parapet - fortification consisting of a low wall
bulwark, rampart, wall - an embankment built around a space for defensive purposes; "they stormed the ramparts of the city"; "they blew the trumpet and the walls came tumbling down"
redoubt - (military) a temporary or supplementary fortification; typically square or polygonal without flanking defenses
stockade - fortification consisting of a fence made of a line of stout posts set firmly for defense
2.fortification - the art or science of strengthening defenses
artistry, prowess, art - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art"
3.fortification - the addition of an ingredient for the purpose of enrichment (as the addition of alcohol to wine or the addition of vitamins to food)
enrichment - act of making fuller or more meaningful or rewarding

fortification

noun
1. reinforcement, protecting, securing, protection, strengthening, reinforcing, embattlement Europe's fortification of its frontiers
2. defence, keep, protection, castle, fort, fortress, stronghold, bastion, citadel, bulwark, fastness troops stationed just behind the fortification
3. strengthening, supplementing, reinforcement nutrient fortification of food
Translations
تَحْصينتَحْصين، تَقْوِيَه
opevněníopevňování
befæstningberigelseforskansning
víggirîingvirkisgerî; styrking
opevnenie
surtahkimattakviye etme

fortification

[ˌfɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] N (= act, means of defence) → fortificación f

fortification

[ˌfɔːrtɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] nfortification f

fortification

n
(= act of fortifying) (of town)Befestigung f; (of wine)Vergärung f; (of food)Anreicherung f; (of person)Bestärkung f
fortifications pl (Mil) → Befestigungen pl, → Festungsanlagen pl

fortification

[ˌfɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃn] nfortificazione f

fortify

(ˈfoːtifai) verb
1. to prepare (a building, city etc) for an attack by strengthening and arming it. The king fortified the castle against the attacking armies.
2. to strengthen or enrich (eg food, drink). Sherry is a fortified wine.
ˌfortifiˈcation (-fi-) noun
1. walls etc built to strengthen an army, city, nation etc against attack. Fortifications surrounded the city.
2. the act of fortifying.
References in periodicals archive ?
For this paper, we have extended the range of field fortification survey by reviewing: i) academic literature on conflict archaeology and heritage sites; ii) internet-based searches for descriptions and images of forest-based battlefields and military earthworks; and iii) examples of heritage trails and associated documentation that have a WW2 focus.
The current mix of SLMs provides for field fortification, limited urban structure, and armor defeat capabilities.
After that, he began the Combat Engineering training, the bread-and-butter skills of all Sappers whether Regular or Territorial, learning about demolitions, bridge building and field fortification.
Secure processing of timber, perform carpentry and joinery in the construction field fortifications at zodolnovEinE[degrees] and repairs of existing military facilities.
Michael, who joined the Royal Engineers aged 16 after attending Shelley High School, was involved in field fortifications, demolition and bridging.
It provided many natural features where German forces could tie in wire obstacles, minefields, and field fortifications.
Acknowledged as the most significant development in field fortifications since the Second World War, HESCO products have become a key component and the benchmark in force protection throughout the world, and have been used in every major conflict since the first Gulf war.
Javelin enhances direct-fire capability against armored vehicles, buildings and field fortifications.
This volume completes my set of the trilogy Earl Hess set out to complete covering the field fortifications in the Civil War depicting the Eastern Theater.
It consisted of a complex system of underground bunkers, anti-tank systems, field fortifications, outposts and artillery fire, and included areas that could be flooded before the system came under assault.
Trench Warfare follows Hess's earlier study of field fortifications up to the Overland Campaign, Field Armies and Fortifications During the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864 (Chapel Hill, 2005), These books are prime examples of areas ripe for scholarly exploration and give the lie to the adage that there is nothing new in Civil War historiography.