hendiadys

(redirected from Figure of twinnes)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

hen·di·a·dys

 (hĕn-dī′ə-dĭs)
n.
A figure of speech in which two words connected by a conjunction are used to express a single notion that would normally be expressed by an adjective and a substantive, such as grace and favor instead of gracious favor.

[Late Latin, from Greek hen dia duoin, one by means of two : hen, neuter of heis, one; see sem- in Indo-European roots + dia, through + duoin, genitive of duo, two; see dwo- in Indo-European roots.]

hendiadys

(hɛnˈdaɪədɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) a rhetorical device by which two nouns joined by a conjunction, usually and, are used instead of a noun and a modifier, as in to run with fear and haste instead of to run with fearful haste
[C16: from Medieval Latin, changed from Greek phrase hen dia duoin, literally: one through two]

hen•di•a•dys

(hɛnˈdaɪ ə dɪs)

n.
a figure of speech in which an idea is expressed by two nouns connected by and instead of a noun and modifier, as in to look with eyes and envyinstead of to look with envious eyes.
[1580–90; < Medieval Latin; alter. of Greek phrase hèn dià dyoîn one through two, one by means of two]

hendiadys

a rhetorical device in which a complex idea is expressed by two substantives joined by a conjunction instead of by a substantive qualified by an adjective.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

hendiadys

The use of two nouns joined by a conjunction instead of one noun and an adjective, such as in “in spite and hatred“ rather than ”in spiteful hatred.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hendiadys - use of two conjoined nouns instead of a noun and modifier
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)