film noir

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film noir

(fĭlm′ nwär′)
n. pl. film noirs (fĭlm′ nwärz′, nwär′) or films noirs (fĭlm′ nwär′)
1. A movie characterized by low-key lighting, a bleak urban setting, and corrupt, cynical characters.
2. The genre or style of such movies.

[French : film, film (from English film; see film) + noir, black (from Old French, from Latin niger, nigr-; see nekw-t- in Indo-European roots).]

film noir

(nwɑː)
n
(Film) a gangster thriller, made esp in the 1940s in Hollywood characterized by contrasty lighting and often somewhat impenetrable plots
[C20: French, literally: black film]

film′ noir′


n.
1. a motion picture genre marked by grim urban settings, cynical, bleakly pessimistic characters, and starkly shadowed photography.
2. a motion picture in this genre.
[1955–60; < French: literally, black film]

film noir

1. A French phrase meaning black film, used to mean the type of moody gangster movies made in the 1940s.
2. Moody style of gangster or thriller film, often shot in dark contrasting images.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.film noir - a movie that is marked by a mood of pessimism, fatalism, menace, and cynical characters; "film noir was applied by French critics to describe American thriller or detective films in the 1940s"
motion picture, motion-picture show, movie, moving picture, moving-picture show, pic, film, picture show, flick, picture - a form of entertainment that enacts a story by sound and a sequence of images giving the illusion of continuous movement; "they went to a movie every Saturday night"; "the film was shot on location"
References in periodicals archive ?
Trouble Is My Business is like most of the films noir of the classic period which were similarly low- and modestly budgeted features without major stars—B movies either literally or in spirit that used great characters saying clever things, eroticism, cruel nature of humans
While Australia has a long tradition of producing crime films, the majority are not considered to be films noir largely due to matters of style, visual iconography and the absence of archetypal features.
One of the most celebrated films noir of the 1940s,it is the story of Manhattan detective Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews), who finds himself falling in love with the woman whose murder he is investigating.
And not all films noir feature femmes fatales: The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1946), for example, is stocked with seductive women, but few are especially duplicitous and their sexuality isn't regarded as threatening to Humphrey Bogart's protagonist.
Pippin argues that several films noir serve as excellent illustrations of this problem, as we see plans go awry and protagonists swept along by currents of events not in their control.
Lining the opposite bank are the many films noir that share Sanctuary's themes and whose visual devices and characters may have sprung partly from its murky depths.
One of the rare modern films noir that's more concerned with character motives than with dark, murderous doings, ``Love Walked In'' suffers from having characters who, ultimately, aren't very interesting.
Double Indemnity shares with other films noir common themes of criminality and guilt.
He appeared in war movies, westerns and films noir.
Before the notion was widely adopted in the 1970s, many of the classic films noirs were referred to as melodramas.
Similarly, the male protagonists of films noirs often confuse the real woman with her painted representation.
Although one could identify scores of films noirs in which chiaroscuro sets the scene for a hyper-perfect, undetectable deception, a fairly representative example appears in Tension (John Berry, 1950), an underappreciated film that begins as a Walter Neff-style murder scheme and transforms into a quintessentially noir "wrong man" scenario.