filter feeder

(redirected from Filter feeders)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

filter feeder

n.
Any of various aquatic animals, such as clams, sponges, and certain whales, that feed by filtering small organisms or organic particles from water.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fil′ter feed`er


n.
any aquatic animal, as a sponge or clam, that feeds by straining food particles and small organisms from the water.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

filter feeder

An aquatic animal, such as a clam or sponge, that feeds by filtering tiny organisms or fine particles of organic material from currents of water that pass through it.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As filter feeders, shellfish absorb the toxins generated by red tide, or the high concentration of algal bloom.
They are Ireland's longest living animal - reaching up to 140 years - and as filter feeders they can help maintain and improve water quality.
They are filter feeders. They eat plankton - such as krill and fish eggs - small nektonic life - including small squid or fish - and phytoplankton - such as algae and other marine plant material.
Driven forward by powerful beats of wing-like pectoral fins, these filter feeders search the waters for prey, their horn-like head fins giving rise to ancient mariners' tales of fearsome devilfish dragging boats into the ocean depths.
Summary: Whale sharks are filter feeders with 300 to 350 rows of tiny teeth.
Biologists pick mussels for this operation as they tend to absorb contaminants from their environment into their tissues in a concentrated way, giving them the nickname "filter feeders." 
Mussels act as "filter feeders" by taking in large amounts of water and then filtering out bacteria, algae and suspended particles before passing the clean water back into the river.
A few responsible producers have introduced new techniques and technologies to combat pollution, from monitoring feed uptake with video cameras to integrating filter feeders like shellfish and seaweed into their systems.
population sizes of the large filter feeders, they say.
A new study highlights the significant risk that microplastics could be posing to iconic large marine animals like baleen whales, whale sharks and manta rays -- all marine filter feeders.