Finikin

Fin´i`kin


a.1.Precise in trifles; idly busy.
References in classic literature ?
Master Nicholas, the village barber, however, used to say that neither of them came up to the Knight of Phoebus, and that if there was any that could compare with him it was Don Galaor, the brother of Amadis of Gaul, because he had a spirit that was equal to every occasion, and was no finikin knight, nor lachrymose like his brother, while in the matter of valour he was not a whit behind him.
She had but two maids with her, finikin lasses, with black eyes and broad bosoms, who set off their lady's more delicate beauty well.
The bearded creatures are quite as eager for praise, quite as finikin over their toilettes, quite as proud of their personal advantages, quite as conscious of their powers of fascination, as any coquette in the world.
This sixteen-member committee was charged with the task of reassessing the country's laws relating to abortion and to hear submissions from various interest groups--from members of the public, including several 'pro-choice' advocacy groups concerned with gender issues (5) and various Christian churches, individuals and groups--regarding proposed amendments to the laws (Heron, Toppin and Finikin 2009).
Stuart Kirkwood, Mark Weaver, Andy Lamb Tom Higgins, Phil Higham, Jon Bond, David Fletcher Mike Hallows, Matt Brooker, Paul Isaacs, Mick Leahy Ed Hammond, Lance Taylor, John Roberts Pictures: Tony Flanagan Michael Staples, Gemma Finikin, Phil Breeden, Louise Brooke Smith
It is what, in Wallace Stevens' phrase, makes a poem "a finikin thing of air," always in relation to the expressiveness of the act of its making.
Stevens acknowledged that poetry "is a finikin thing of air / That lives uncertainly and not for long.
That year, George du Maurier, who had met Leighton in Paris, described him as 'very blase and finikin, and quite spoilt - one of the world's little darlings'.