finite

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Related to Finite number: Infinite number

fi·nite

 (fī′nīt′)
adj.
1.
a. Having bounds; limited: a finite list of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves.
b. Existing, persisting, or enduring for a limited time only; impermanent.
2. Mathematics
a. Being neither infinite nor infinitesimal.
b. Having a positive or negative numerical value; not zero.
c. Possible to reach or exceed by counting. Used of a number.
d. Having a limited number of elements. Used of a set.
3. Grammar Of or relating to any of the forms of a verb that can occur on their own in a main clause and that can formally express distinctions in person, number, tense, mood, and voice, often by means of conjugation, as the verb sees in She sees the sign.
n.
A finite thing.

[Middle English finit, from Latin fīnītus, past participle of fīnīre, to limit, from fīnis, end.]

fi′nite′ly adv.
fi′nite′ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

finite

(ˈfaɪnaɪt)
adj
1. (Mathematics) bounded in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent: a finite difference.
2. (Mathematics) maths logic having a number of elements that is a natural number; able to be counted using the natural numbers less than some natural number. Compare denumerable, infinite4
3.
a. limited or restricted in nature: human existence is finite.
b. (as noun): the finite.
4. (Grammar) denoting any form or occurrence of a verb inflected for grammatical features such as person, number, and tense
[C15: from Latin fīnītus limited, from fīnīre to limit, end]
ˈfinitely adv
ˈfiniteness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fi•nite

(ˈfaɪ naɪt)

adj.
1. having bounds or limits; not infinite; measurable.
2.
a. (of a set of mathematical elements) capable of being completely counted.
b. not infinite or infinitesimal.
c. not zero.
3. subject to limitations or conditions, as of space, time, circumstances, or the laws of nature.
4.
a. (of a verb form) distinguishing person, number, and tense, as well as mood or aspect, as opens in She opens the window.
b. (of a clause) containing a finite verb.
n.
5. something that is finite.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin fīnītus, past participle of fīnīre to stop, limit. See fine1, -ite2]
fi′nite•ly, adv.
fi′nite•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fi·nite

(fī′nīt′)
Having a bound or limit; not infinite or unbounded: a finite sum; a finite line segment.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.finite - bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent
mortal - subject to death; "mortal beings"
infinite - having no limits or boundaries in time or space or extent or magnitude; "the infinite ingenuity of man"; "infinite wealth"
2.finite - of verbs; relating to forms of the verb that are limited in time by a tense and (usually) show agreement with number and person
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
non-finite, infinite - of verbs; having neither person nor number nor mood (as a participle or gerund or infinitive); "infinite verb form"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

finite

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
لَه فاعِلمَحْدود
konečnýomezenýurčitý
begrænsetfinit
lõplik
äärellinenpäättyvä
ragozottvéges
í persónuhættitakmarkaîur
asmenuojamasisribotas
darbības vārda finītā formaierobežots
çekimlisınırlı

finite

[ˈfaɪnaɪt]
A. ADJ
1. (= limited) (of distance) → finito; [resources] → limitado
is the universe finite?¿el universo es finito?
to make the best use of finite resourceshacer el mejor uso posible de recursos limitados
we have only a finite amount of money to investsólo disponemos de una cantidad limitada de dinero para invertir
2. (Ling) [mood, verb] → conjugado
B. CPD finite verb Nverbo m conjugado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

finite

[ˈfaɪnaɪt] adj
[number] → fini(e); [resources] → limité(e)
(GRAMMAR) [verb] → conjugué(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

finite

adj
(= limited) set, amount, time, resourcesbegrenzt; universeendlich; a finite numbereine begrenzte Zahl; (Math) → eine endliche Zahl; coal and oil are finite resourcesKohle und Öl sind nicht erneuerbare Ressourcen; there is a finite limit to the weight a human can liftein Mensch kann höchstens ein bestimmtes Gewicht heben
(Rel, Philos) being, worldendlich
(Gram) verb, clausefinit
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

finite

[ˈfaɪnaɪt] adj
a. (limited) → limitato/a
b. (Gram) (verb) → finito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

finite

(ˈfainait) adjective
1. having an end or limit. Human knowledge is finite, divine knowledge infinite.
2. (of a verb) having a subject. He speaks; I ran; She fell.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

finite

a. finito-a, que tiene límites.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"We appreciate that waiting for an ambulance can be a distressing time, but we can only categorise based on the information given to us and, with a finite number of resources, we must send available ambulances to the most serious life-threatening cases first.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- With today's study, researchers have pinpointed a genomic mechanism by which a finite number of genes can ultimately help distinguish a seemingly near-infinite number of scents.
Marchenko and Slavin explore inverse problems in the theory of small oscillations of systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom.
The move caused alarm among parents of children with special educational needs but the authority said it only had a finite number of guides and they had to prioritise what routes they were used on.
The move caused alarm among parents of children with special educational needs, but the authority said it only had a finite number of guides and they had to prioritise what routes they were used on.
We appreciate services can become very busy and as such we are constantly reviewing the busiest services to ensure our finite number of trains are targeted to the right places.
Mosaic is short for HP SmartStream Mosaic, which can create countless unique-to-unit labels from a finite number of original designs.
This includes adding cars to some trains by subtracting cars from other trains (since we have a finite number of railcars)."
"There's just a finite number of aircraft," he said.
In contrast to men who produce new sperm cells throughout their life women are born with a finite number of oocytes.
And because there are a finite number of words in the English language that are grammatically correct, they are just starting to make stuff up.