Finno-Ugrian


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Finno-Ugrian: Finno-Ugric, Finno-ugric language group

Fin·no-U·gric

 (fĭn′ō-o͞o′grĭk, -yo͞o′-) also Fin·no-U·gri·an (-grē-ən)
n.
A subfamily of the Uralic language family that includes Finnish, Hungarian, and other languages of eastern Europe and northwest Russia.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Finns and the Ugrians.
2. Of or relating to Finno-Ugric.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Finno-Ugrian - a family of Uralic languages indigenous to Scandinavia and Hungary and Russia and western Siberia (prior to the Slavic expansion into those regions)
Uralic, Uralic language - a family of Ural-Altaic languages
Fennic, Finnic, Non-Ugric - one of two branches of the Finno-Ugric languages; a family of languages including Finnish and Estonian (but not Hungarian)
Ugrian, Ugric - one of the two branches of the Finno-Ugric family of languages; spoken in Hungary and northwestern Siberia
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Finno-Ugrian

[ˈfɪnəʊˈuːgrɪən] Finno-Ugric [ˈfɪnəʊˈuːgrɪk]
A. ADJfino-húngaro
B. N (Ling) → fino-húngaro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Shaw's assessment of relevant Anglo-Saxon sources; a contribution by Thomas DuBois and Bernhard Maier on Finno-Ugrian views and Celtic-Scandinavia interactions respectively; another by Vladimir J.
http://www.helsinki.fi/folkloristiikka/Summer590618_4_0_RMN_10%20Summer_2015.pdf FU = Finno-Ugrian collection, National Board of Antiquities.
(21) In 1969, the American historian Denis Sinor, in the foreword to his lexical course for students at Indiana University, defined "Inner Asia" as a synonym of "Central Eurasia," the homeland of both Altaic peoples (Mongolian, Turkic, and Manchu-Tungus) and Uralic ones (Finno-Ugrian and Samoyed).
The Institute of Musicology of the Research Centre for the Humanities, Hungarian Academy of Sciences maintained until the summer of 2012 two large Archives of international interest functioning at the same time as research groups: the Bartok Archives preserving Bela Bartok's estate (2) and the Folk Music and Folk Dance Archives keeping not only Hungarian folk music and dance material but items collected among minorities, neighbouring peoples, Finno-Ugrian, Turkic and other ethnicities as well.
Julius Magiste's monumental "Estnisches etymologisches Worterbuch" remained unfinished because of the death of the author, but Finno-Ugrian Society in Helsinki published the manuscript of it in 1983 in twelve volumes (EEW).
In ancient times, the area was inhabited by Livs--a Baltic Finno-Ugrian tribe that lived in the territory of Latvia.
The comparative perspective cuts across the conventional boundaries between Romance, Germanic, Slavonic, and Finno-Ugrian language groups and so provides a new perspective on relations between languages and between nations.
(3) In a certain way, Transylvania is a miniature Europe, including both the main ethnic groups (Latin, Germanic, Slavic, and also Finno-Ugrian) and the main religions and denominations (Orthodox, Catholic, Mosaic, Protestant and Neo-Protestant denominations, etc.) that define our continent.
As well wrought as works by Jerne's idols Hans Christian Andersen, Oscar Wilde, and Lewis Carroll, The Finno-Ugrian Vampire belongs at the top of your "must-read" list.