fiscal policy

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fiscal policy

The government’s plan for taxation and government spending. Fiscal policy is one way in which a government can attempt to control the economy. Another way is through monetary policy which attempts to guide the economy by controlling the money supply.
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Noun1.fiscal policy - a government policy for dealing with the budget (especially with taxation and borrowing)
economic policy - a government policy for maintaining economic growth and tax revenues
References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- Pakistan's economic growth will be negatively impacted in the short run due to tighter monetary and fiscal policies as a result of the International Monetary Fund's bailout package, a leading economic research firm said in a report on Wednesday.
ISLAMABAD -- The Monetary and Fiscal Policies Coordination Board on Monday was presented with a plan by the government to stiffen loose fiscal policies that are injuring economic stabilization efforts.
Perotti (2002) reported positive effects of fiscal policies on the price level and interest rate.
Several studies have explained the significance of fiscal policies in shaping pattern of economic growth via two types of public spending i.e.
Pro-cyclical fiscal policies increase growth rates in the business cycle upswings and lower them even more to very negative levels in recessions.
This report discusses fiscal trends in policies aimed at reducing fiscal vulnerabilities and boosting medium-term growth, recent fiscal developments and the fiscal outlook in advanced economies, emerging markets, and low-income developing countries; recent trends in government debt and analysis of changes in fiscal balances, revenue, and spending; potential fiscal risks; and growth from the fiscal policies. It also describes how digitalization can help governments improve implementation of current policy and widen the range of policy options, and opportunities and risks for fiscal policy, including improvements in policy implementation, the design of future policy, and how digitalization can create opportunities for fraud and increase government vulnerabilities.
Fiscal policies must, therefore, be embedded in caution than exuberance.
This paper addresses three questions for the design of intergovernmental macroeconomic fiscal policies. First, are such policies necessary?
A quick glance at fiscal policies today should further convince us of the importance of this discussion:
This has brought the number of developing countries that have pursued countercyclical fiscal policies over the last 15 years to 35 percent from just 19 percent in the period 1960-1999.
England would set its fiscal policies (and other non-monetary and non-fiscal policies such as structural reforms) independently and without Scottish input, and vice versa.