nuclear power

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nuclear power

n.
1. Power, especially electricity, the source of which is nuclear fission.
2. A nation or group possessing nuclear weapons.

nuclear power

n
(General Physics) power, esp electrical or motive, produced by a nuclear reactor. Also called: atomic power

nuclear power

Not to be used without appropriate modifier. See also civil nuclear power; major nuclear power; military nuclear power; nuclear nation; nuclear weapons state.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nuclear power - nuclear energy regarded as a source of electricity for the power grid (for civilian use)nuclear power - nuclear energy regarded as a source of electricity for the power grid (for civilian use)
atomic energy, nuclear energy - the energy released by a nuclear reaction
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Under this project, NASA will partner with the Department of Energy's Nevada National Security Site to appraise fission power technologies.
Los Alamos National Laboratory, in partnership with NASA Research Centers and other DOE National Labs, is developing and rapidly maturing a suite of very small fission power sources to meet power needs that range from hundreds of Watts-electric (We) to 100 kWe.
VERA is a physics simulation tool that visualizes the internal processes of commercial nuclear fission power plants and predicts reactor behavior in a number of potential scenarios.
It underlines our leading expertise in nuclear remote handling and robotics and highlights the key role we are playing in developing future nuclear technologies while continuing to support the existing nuclear fission power industry.
Because of the current uneven acceptance of nuclear fission power, a conceptual fusion power system should clearly be more attractive, if it is to meet the EPRI criteria at some future date.
In resolving the complex problems that fusion and fission power present we will be in a much better position to address commercial needs in other sectors, from mining to oil and gas extraction and processing, through to space exploration.
The imminent second nuclear era requires the introduction of inherently more efficient, safer, cheaper, nuclear fission power.
Fusion power is safer and more efficient than nuclear fission power.