fission products


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fission products

A general term for the complex mixture of substances produced as a result of nuclear fission.
References in periodicals archive ?
as well as activation and fission products, and medical isotopes.
The paper "A Conceptual Approach to Eliminate Bypass Release of Fission Products by In-Containment Relief Valve under SGTR Accident" presents the conceptual design of the ICRV (In-Containment Relief Valve) as effective means to mitigate the release to the environment of fission products from the SGTR (Steam Generator Tube Rupture) accident.
The beta decay of radioactive fission products generates neutrinos in very large quantities.
In the Moltex design, the salt is held in vented tubes, which is possible because the fission products form compounds a in the salt.
Driven by the decay power of the fission products and the high temperature, the basemat concrete, which is the last barrier that prevents leakage of the radioactive products into environment in the second-generation NPPs, starts to ablate [1,2].
Depleted bundles contain small amounts of fission products and fissile plutonium, which are dangerously radioactive.
"Over the years you have to pull the rods out higher and higher to expose more of the fuel because the fuel on the bottom of the core gets used up, or all these fission products are keeping it from reacting efficiently," Clark said.
Caesium-137, or radiocaesium, is a radioactive isotope of Caesium formed as one of the more common fission products by the nuclear fission of Uranium-235 and other fissionable isotopes in nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons.
This radioactive nucleus, one of the fission products resulting from the fissioning of uranium, is an effective absorber of thermal neutrons.
In the nuclear process, mildly radioactive uranium is taken from the ground and bombarded by neutrons--and that part of the uranium which can split (is "fissile") Uranium-235, is transformed into radioactive twins of safe and stable elements in nature: There are hundreds of these "fission products." The human body doesn't know the difference between these lethal twins and safe and stable elements.
Antineutrinos are produced not only in the decay of uranium, thorium, and potassium isotopes but in a variety of others, including fission products in nuclear power reactors.
About 3% of the mass of spent nuclear fuel consists of fission products including strontium-90.' Because of its high decay energy and its long half-life of 30 years--it takes hundreds of years to decay naturally to harmless levels--strontium-90 is classified a high-level waste.