flagstone

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flag·stone

 (flăg′stōn′)
n.
1. A flat slab of stone used as a paving material.
2. An evenly layered sedimentary rock that can be split into paving stones.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flagstone

(ˈflæɡˌstəʊn) or

flag

n
1. (Geological Science) a hard fine-textured rock, such as a sandstone or shale, that can be split up into slabs for paving
2. (Building) a slab of such a rock
[C15 flag (in the sense: sod, turf), from Old Norse flaga slab; compare Old English flæcg plaster, poultice]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

flag•stone

(ˈflægˌstoʊn)

n.
a stone slab used for paving.
[1720–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flagstone - stratified stone that splits into pieces suitable as paving stonesflagstone - stratified stone that splits into pieces suitable as paving stones
paving stone - a stone used for paving
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

flagstone

noun paving stone, flag, slab, block If we trip over a flagstone, we can sue the council.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

flagstone

[ˈflægstəʊn] Nlosa f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

flagstone

[ˈflægstəʊn]
ndalle f
modif
flagstone floor → sol m en dallesflag stop n (US) (for bus)arrêt m facultatifflag-waving [ˈflægweɪvɪŋ]
n (= jingoism) → chauvinisme m
modif [people] → cocardier/ière
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
Kneeling on the flagstones by the light of Daddy Jacques's lantern he removed the clothes from the body and laid bare its breast.
His rheumaticky feet, tired with balancing that squat body for many years upon the decks of small coasters, and made sore by miles of tramping upon the flagstones of the dock side, had hurried up in time to avert a ridiculous catastrophe.
Upon the large square in front of the hotel, the shadows of the tents, intersected by the golden moonbeams, formed as it were a huge mosaic of jet and yellow flagstones. Soon, however, the entire town was wrapped in slumber; a feeble light still glimmered in Madame's apartment, which looked out upon the square, and the soft rays from the expiring lamp seemed to be the image of the calm sleep of a young girl, hardly yet sensible of life's anxieties, and in whom the flame of existence sinks placidly as sleep steals over the body.
The deacon's hand in a plush cuff accepted a three-rouble note unobtrusively, and the deacon said he would put it down in the register, and his new boots creaking jauntily over the flagstones of the empty church, he went to the altar.
We met no other wayfarers on the deserted flagstones, and were ourselves favored with a very hard stare from the constable of the beat, who, however, touched his helmet on recognizing my companion.
that sounded like a musket-butt on flagstones he sat down amid leaping glasses.
A sense of stairs descended as if in a dream, of flagstones, of a chaise and horses standing, then a street, and a turning into another street where a stage-coach was standing, taking in passengers, and the darting thought that that coach would take her away, perhaps toward home.
How vividly I call to mind the damp about the house, the green cracked flagstones in the court, an old leaky water-butt, and the discoloured trunks of some of the grim trees, which seemed to have dripped more in the rain than other trees, and to have blown less in the sun!
I got up, and went down into the great hall, and so out upon the flagstones in front of the palace.
The masks had gone home and our footsteps echoed on the flagstones with unequal sound as of men without purpose, without hope.
And all the time the stream of shabby people was hastening by us, with the continuous dreary shuffling of weary footsteps on the flagstones. The sunshine falling on the grime of surfaces, on the poverty of tones and forms seemed of an inferior quality, its joy faded, its brilliance tarnished and dusty.
A misty rain settled like silvery dust on clothes, on moustaches; wetted the faces, varnished the flagstones, darkened the walls, dripped from umbrellas.