flame retardant

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flame retardant

n.
A substance that is applied to fabric, wood, or other material in order to make it resistant to catching fire. Also called fire retardant.

flame′-re·tar′dant adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, new phosphorus-based flame retardants are presented and the performance of these products in flexible polyurethane foam is compared to other established flame retardants.
But flame retardants can achieve their full effect only if the right processing aids are used in the production of the flame-retardant compounds.
15 million tonnes of flame retardants are used per year for plastic products, electronic devices, construction material, and textiles.
The global flame retardants market is projected to reach USD 12.
WASHINGTON -- The US Environmental Protection Agency has released an updated draft alternatives assessment of the environmental and human health impacts of flame retardants used or that could be used in printed circuit boards for electronics products, such as cellphones and computers.
These flame retardants are designed to replace hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), which has been the leading flame retardant used in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foam applications, but is being phased out in the European Union (EU), Japan and other countries.
Editors Morgan and Wilkie discuss non-halogenated flame retardants in this concise reference handbook.
Halogenated flame retardants are not used, so UF Grade filmAEs impact on the environment and human health is minimized.
Halogenated flame retardants are not used, so UF Grade film s impact on the environment and human health is minimized.
The study suggests more than two million tonnes of flame retardants were consumed in 2013, owing to the increased demand for plastics in the construction, automotive and electronics industries.
Intumescent flame retardants are widely used in thermoplastic polyester elastomers; however, they are incompatible with polyesters, resulting in poor scratch resistance and scratch-whitening.
Additive brominated flame retardants for thermoplastic and thermoset resins.