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Related to Flashes: Hot flashes


v. flashed, flash·ing, flash·es
1. To burst forth into or as if into flame.
2. To give off light or be lighted in sudden or intermittent bursts.
3. To appear or occur suddenly: The image flashed onto the screen.
4. To move or proceed rapidly: The cars flashed by.
5. To hang up a phone line momentarily, as when using call waiting.
6. Slang To think of or remember something suddenly: flashed on that time we got caught in the storm.
7. Slang To expose oneself in an indecent manner.
a. To cause (light) to appear suddenly or in intermittent bursts.
b. To cause to burst into flame.
c. To reflect (light).
d. To cause to reflect light from (a surface).
2. To make known or signal by flashing lights.
3. To communicate or display at great speed: flashed the news to the world capitals.
4. To exhibit briefly.
5. To hang up (a phone line) momentarily, as when using call waiting.
6. To display ostentatiously; flaunt.
7. To fill suddenly with water.
8. To cover with a thin protective layer.
1. A sudden, brief, intense display of light.
2. A sudden perception: a flash of insight.
3. A split second; an instant: I'll be on my way in a flash.
4. A brief news dispatch or transmission.
5. Slang Gaudy or ostentatious display: "The antique flash and trash of an older southern California have given way to a sleeker age of cultural hip" (Newsweek).
6. A flashlight.
a. Instantaneous illumination for photography: photograph by flash.
b. A device, such as a flashbulb, flashgun, or flash lamp, used to produce such illumination.
8. Slang The pleasurable sensation that accompanies the use of a drug; a rush.
9. Archaic The language or cant of thieves, tramps, or underworld figures.
1. Happening suddenly or very quickly: flash freezing.
2. Slang Ostentatious; showy: a flash car.
3. Of or relating to figures of quarterly economic growth released by the government and subject to later revision.
4. Of or relating to photography using instantaneous illumination.
5. Computers Of or relating to flash memory.
6. Archaic Of or relating to thieves, swindlers, and underworld figures.
Phrasal Verb:
flash back
1. To experience a psychological flashback: She suddenly flashed back to the moment when the car hit her.
2. To employ a flashback as a narrative device: In the second chapter, the book flashes back to the protagonist's childhood.
flash in the pan
One that promises great success but fails.

[Middle English flashen, to splash, variant of flasken, of imitative origin.]
Synonyms: flash, gleam, glint, sparkle, glitter, glisten, glimmer, twinkle, scintillate
These verbs mean to send forth light. Flash refers to a sudden and brilliant but short-lived outburst of light: A bolt of lightning flashed across the horizon. Gleam implies a transient or subdued light that often appears against a dark background: "The light gleams an instant, then it's night once more" (Samuel Beckett).
Glint applies to briefly gleaming or flashing light: "the fountain's silver-painted swan glinted in the moonlight" (Kate Wheeler).
Sparkle suggests a rapid succession of little flashes of high brilliance (crystal glasses sparkling in the candlelight), and glitter, a similar succession of even greater intensity (jewels glittering in the display case). To glisten is to shine with a sparkling luster: The snow glistened in the dawn light. Glimmer refers to faint, fleeting light: "On the French coast the light / Gleams, and is gone; the cliffs of England stand, / Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay" (Matthew Arnold).
To twinkle is to shine with quick, intermittent flashes or gleams: "a few stars, twinkling faintly in the deep blue of the night sky" (Hugh Walpole).
Scintillate is applied to what flashes as if emitting sparks in a continuous stream: "a dense, hoary mist of ammonium chloride ... depositing minute scintillating crystals on the windowpanes" (Primo Levi). See Also Synonyms at moment.


A trademark for a file format for graphics, audio, and video data, commonly used for transmitting animation over the internet.


 of merriment: sudden bursts, 1603
References in classic literature ?
The thunder continued to rumble and flashes of heat lightning lit up the eastern sky.
Half the sky was chequered with black thunderheads, but all the west was luminous and clear: in the lightning flashes it looked like deep blue water, with the sheen of moonlight on it; and the mottled part of the sky was like marble pavement, like the quay of some splendid seacoast city, doomed to destruction.
The bright flashes and the quick reports of a dozen rifles, from the opposite banks of the stream, followed this incautious exposure of his person, and left the unfortunate singing master senseless on that rock where he had been so long slumbering.
It came with bright flashes of sunlight by day, with deep, monotonous shadow at night; with the onset of heavy winds, the roar of turbulent woods, the tumultuous tossing of leafy arms, and with what seemed the silent dissolution of the whole landscape in days of steady and uninterrupted downfall.
Either it was one of those up-quivering flashes of the spirit, to which minds in an abnormal state are liable, or else the artist had subtly touched some chord that made musical vibration.
The heat that had formerly pervaded his nature, and which was not yet extinct, was never of the kind that flashes and flickers in a blaze; but rather a deep red glow, as of iron in a furnace.
They were practically simultaneous, yet they had flashes of succession.
The peeled white body of the beheaded whale flashes like a marble sepulchre; though changed in hue, it has not perceptibly lost anything in bulk.
On the other side the yard windows were thrown up, and people were shouting all sorts of things; but I kept my eye fixed on the stable door, where the smoke poured out thicker than ever, and I could see flashes of red light; presently I heard above all the stir and din a loud, clear voice, which I knew was master's:
And what a glance she had: when it fell in reproof upon those servants, they shrunk and quailed as timid people do when the lightning flashes out of a cloud.