necrotizing fasciitis

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necrotizing fasciitis

n.
Severe, rapidly progressing infection of subcutaneous tissues by streptococci and other bacteria, marked by tissue necrosis and by pain, swelling, and heat in the affected area, usually following an injury or a surgical procedure.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Orlando man is fighting an aggressive battle after contracting a flesh-eating bacteria - one that has already extracted a heavy toll.
Doctors later determined that the patient contracted the flesh-eating bacteria called necrotizing fasciitis.A
23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a horrible fate: You take a cool dip in the ocean and become infected with flesh-eating bacteria.
They usually go to the Outer Banks, but are a bit leery about going to the ocean, what with sharks, flesh-eating bacteria, red tide.
TUESDAY, July 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A Florida woman died late last week from flesh-eating bacteria two weeks after cutting her leg while walking along the coast.
She went back to her doctor just in case, oblivious that the deadly necrotising fasciitis - the flesh-eating bacteria - was working its way through her internal organs.
A 71-year-old man had his hand amputated as it started rotting due to a deadly flesh-eating bacteria 12 hours after he ate sushi, reports Metro.UK.
On the impetus to start such a program, Copeland says: "After surviving flesh-eating Bacteria at the cost of my limbs, I've seen firsthand how difficult it can be to find fulfillment in the same activities that I once loved.
A Department of Health (DOH) official said that any person can be afflicted with a flesh-eating bacteria called "necrotizing fasciitis" in jails due to the congestion and poor ventilation in these facilities.
An inmate of the Manila city jail died of flesh-eating bacteria, which he acquired while in detention on Sunday night.
The story was about a healthy 33-year-old woman in Nova Scotia who contracted a flesh-eating bacteria after giving birth in March.
A toothbrush can harbor streptococcus mutans--the same bacteria responsible for MRSA infections, flesh-eating bacteria, and tooth decay.