flexitarian

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Related to Flexitarianism: Semi-vegetarian

flexitarian

one who eats mostly a vegetarian diet but will occasionally eat meat or fish
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

flex·i·tar·i·an

 (flĕk′sĭ-târ′ē-ən)
n.
One who normally maintains a vegetarian diet but occasionally makes exceptions and eats meat or fish.
adj.
Of or relating to a diet that is primarily vegetarian but includes meat or fish on occasion.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

flexitarian

(ˌflɛksɪˈtɛərɪən)
n
(Cookery) a person who eats a predominantly vegetarian diet, but who eats meat or fish occasionally
adj
(Cookery) of or relating to a flexitarian: flexitarian fare.
[C21: from flexi(ble) + (vege)tarian]
ˌflexiˈtarianˌism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The research into the rise of flexitarianism across the country, which was conducted on behalf of plant-based experts https://allplants.com/, found that Edinburgh came in just behind Tonbridge, the market town in Kent, as the UK's most flexitarian towns and cities.
'Flexitarianism by stealth' is quickly gaining traction, with retailers like Tesco and Waitrose already offering lines that mix meat and veg.
Flexitarianism is on the rise as many people believe that it has the right balance of health and protein without changing lifestyles too drastically.
The trend is reflected in so-called "flexitarianism" -- a plant-based diet with the occasional inclusion of meat -- and veganism, which means the abstention from consumption of any animal products including dairy.
Flexitarianism or "casual vegetarianism' is an increasingly popular, plantbased diet that claims to reduce your carbon footprint and improve your health with an eating regime that's mostly vegetarian yet allows for the occasional meat dish.
FLEXITARIANISM SCIENTISTS say we should all be embracing the 'flexitarian' diet if we want to limit climate change and work towards a sustainable future.
FLEXITARIANISM SCIENTISTS say we should all be embracing the "flexitarian" diet if we want to limit climate change and work towards a sustainable future.
"One ongoing trend is 'flexitarianism,' the growing semi-vegetarian trend that replaces animal-based protein with varying degrees of fruits and vegetables," says Bil Goldfield, director of corporate communications for Dole Food Co., Westlake Village, Calif.
The rise of veganism, so-called flexitarianism, time-poor families, single-person households, adventurous food options, plantbased or lab-grown meat are all delivering options and considerations that were never before available.
Another trend, called "flexitarianism", is also in development: it corresponds to an irregular and occasional reduction of meat consumption, meat being no longer the centre of every meal.