Florence


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Flor·ence

 (flôr′əns, flŏr′-) also Fi·ren·ze (fē-rĕn′dzĕ)
A city of central Italy on the Arno River east of Pisa. Originally an Etruscan settlement, then a Roman town, Florence was a powerful city-state under the Medici family during the Italian Renaissance, with a brilliant artistic flowering led by Giotto, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Dante Alighieri, and Raphael. Florence was the capital of newly unified Italy from 1865 to 1871, when the government was moved to Rome.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Florence

(ˈflɒrəns)
n
(Placename) a city in central Italy, on the River Arno in Tuscany: became an independent republic in the 14th century; under Austrian and other rule intermittently from 1737 to 1859; capital of Italy 1865–70. It was the major cultural and artistic centre of the Renaissance and is still one of the world's chief art centres. Pop: 356 118 (2001). Ancient name: Florentia Italian name: Firenze
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Flor•ence

(ˈflɔr əns, ˈflɒr-)

n.
a city in Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River. 421,299. Italian, Firenze.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Florence - a city in central Italy on the ArnoFlorence - a city in central Italy on the Arno; provincial capital of Tuscany; center of the Italian Renaissance from 14th to 16th centuries
Toscana, Tuscany - a region in central Italy
Florentine - a native or resident of Florence, Italy
2.Florence - a town in northeast South Carolina; transportation center
Palmetto State, SC, South Carolina - a state in the Deep South; one of the original 13 colonies
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Firenze
Firenze
Florencja

Florence

[ˈflɒrəns] NFlorencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Florence

[ˈflɒrəns] nFlorence
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Florence

nFlorenz nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Florence

[ˈflɒrns] nFirenze f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Editions of the Homeric Hymns, & c.: -- Demetrius Chalcondyles, Florence, 1488 (with the "Epigrams" and the "Battle of the Frogs and Mice" in the "ed.
It makes a body ooze sarcasm at every pore, to go about Rome and Florence and see what this last generation has been doing with the statues.
At the door of the Uffizzi, in Florence, one is confronted by statues of a man and a woman, noseless, battered, black with accumulated grime--they hardly suggest human beings-- yet these ridiculous creatures have been thoughtfully and conscientiously fig-leaved by this fastidious generation.
"My dear florence," he asked, "where are the others?"
"And there are some risks, my dear Florence, which are worth every drop of blood in a man's body, and every breath of life.
Hearing from his foreign correspondents of two women who had made successful first appearances, one at Milan and one at Florence, he had arranged to visit those cities, and to judge of the merits of the dancers for himself, before he joined the bride and bridegroom.
Or, if passengers desire to visit Parma (famous for Correggio's frescoes) and Bologna, they can by rail go on to Florence, and rejoin the steamer at Leghorn, thus spending about three weeks amid the cities most famous for art in Italy.
From Genoa the run to Leghorn will be made along the coast in one night, and time appropriated to this point in which to visit Florence, its palaces and galleries; Pisa, its cathedral and "Leaning Tower," and Lucca and its baths, and Roman amphitheater; Florence, the most remote, being distant by rail about sixty miles.
He was also a good deal in debt: it was difficult to live in London like a gentleman on three hundred a year; and his heart yearned for the Venice and Florence which John Ruskin had so magically described.
Cosmus, duke of Florence, had a desperate saying against perfidious or neglecting friends, as if those wrongs were unpardonable; You shall read (saith he) that we are commanded to forgive our enemies; but you never read, that we are commanded to forgive our friends.
The action takes place at Florence in the early sixteenth century.
It was pleasant to wake up in Florence, to open the eyes upon a bright bare room, with a floor of red tiles which look clean though they are not; with a painted ceiling whereon pink griffins and blue amorini sport in a forest of yellow violins and bassoons.