Florentine


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Flor·en·tine

 (flôr′ən-tēn′, -tīn′, flŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to Florence, Italy.
2. often florentine Having or characterized by a dull chased or rubbed finish. Used of gold.
3. Prepared, cooked, or served with spinach.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Florence, Italy.
2. also florentine A crisp, thin cookie made with almonds or other nuts and sometimes candied fruit, often topped with chocolate.

[Latin Flōrentīnus, from Flōrentia, Florence, Italy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Florentine

(ˈflɒrənˌtaɪn)
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to Florence
2. (Cookery) (usually postpositive) (of food) served or prepared with spinach
n
3. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Florence
4. (Cookery) a biscuit containing nuts and dried fruit and coated with chocolate
5. (Breeds) a type of domestic fancy pigeon somewhat resembling the Modena
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Flor•en•tine

(ˈflɔr ənˌtin, -ˌtaɪn, ˈflɒr-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Florence, Italy.
2. (of food) served or prepared with spinach: eggs Florentine.
n.
3. a native or resident of Florence.
[1535–45; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Florentine - a native or resident of Florence, Italy
Firenze, Florence - a city in central Italy on the Arno; provincial capital of Tuscany; center of the Italian Renaissance from 14th to 16th centuries
Italian - a native or inhabitant of Italy
Adj.1.Florentine - of or relating to or characteristic of the city of Florence; "Florentine art"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Florentine

[ˈflɒrəntaɪn]
A. ADJflorentino
B. Nflorentino/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Florentine

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Florentine

[ˈflɒrnˌtaɪn] adj & nfiorentino/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
A charming old Italian writer has laid down the canons of perfect feminine beauty with much nicety in a delicious discourse, which, as he delivered it in a sixteenth- century Florentine garden to an audience of beautiful and noble ladies, an audience not too large to be intimate and not too small to be embarrassing, it was his delightful good fortune and privilege to illustrate by pretty and sly references to the characteristic beauties of the several ladies seated like a ring of roses around him.
We tried indolently to recollect something about the Guelphs and Ghibelines and the other historical cut-throats whose quarrels and assassinations make up so large a share of Florentine history, but the subject was not attractive.
Florentine mosaics are the choicest in all the world.
They all call it a river, and they honestly think it is a river, do these dark and bloody Florentines. They even help out the delusion by building bridges over it.
Then, after his valet had reminded him several times of the lateness of the hour, he got up, and going into the next room, placed the book on the little Florentine table that always stood at his bedside and began to dress for dinner.
In the poem a Florentine lady of old time, wedded to a cold and cruel husband, had died, or was supposed to have died, and had been carried to "the rich, the beautiful, the dreadful tomb" of her proud family.
She was, in very truth, the Florentine judge, stern, stately, impassive.
We were of the old Florentine nobility"-- Rowena's heart gave a great bound, her nostrils expanded, and a fine light played in her eyes--"and when the war broke out, my father was on the losing side and had to fly for his life.
"Yes, a chef d'oeuvre of the great Florentine sculptor, Benvenuto Cellini," replied Athos.
How could a Florentine cab-driver ever get hold of Cecil?"
I affirm that he shared the general beatitude, and that, quite the reverse of La Fontaine, who, at the presentation of his comedy of the "Florentine," asked, "Who is the ill-bred lout who made that rhapsody?" Gringoire would gladly have inquired of his neighbor, "Whose masterpiece is this?"
The king, however, having acquired Lombardy, regained at once the authority which Charles had lost: Genoa yielded; the Florentines became his friends; the Marquess of Mantua, the Duke of Ferrara, the Bentivogli, my lady of Forli, the Lords of Faenza, of Pesaro, of Rimini, of Camerino, of Piombino, the Lucchese, the Pisans, the Sienese--everybody made advances to him to become his friend.