Florence

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Related to Florentine Republic: Niccolo Machiavelli

Flor·ence

 (flôr′əns, flŏr′-) also Fi·ren·ze (fē-rĕn′dzĕ)
A city of central Italy on the Arno River east of Pisa. Originally an Etruscan settlement, then a Roman town, Florence was a powerful city-state under the Medici family during the Italian Renaissance, with a brilliant artistic flowering led by Giotto, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Dante Alighieri, and Raphael. Florence was the capital of newly unified Italy from 1865 to 1871, when the government was moved to Rome.

Florence

(ˈflɒrəns)
n
(Placename) a city in central Italy, on the River Arno in Tuscany: became an independent republic in the 14th century; under Austrian and other rule intermittently from 1737 to 1859; capital of Italy 1865–70. It was the major cultural and artistic centre of the Renaissance and is still one of the world's chief art centres. Pop: 356 118 (2001). Ancient name: Florentia Italian name: Firenze

Flor•ence

(ˈflɔr əns, ˈflɒr-)

n.
a city in Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River. 421,299. Italian, Firenze.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Florence - a city in central Italy on the ArnoFlorence - a city in central Italy on the Arno; provincial capital of Tuscany; center of the Italian Renaissance from 14th to 16th centuries
Toscana, Tuscany - a region in central Italy
Florentine - a native or resident of Florence, Italy
2.Florence - a town in northeast South Carolina; transportation center
Palmetto State, SC, South Carolina - a state in the Deep South; one of the original 13 colonies
Translations
Firenze
Firenze
Florencja

Florence

[ˈflɒrəns] NFlorencia f

Florence

[ˈflɒrəns] nFlorence

Florence

nFlorenz nt

Florence

[ˈflɒrns] nFirenze f
References in periodicals archive ?
Historical research into Machiavelli's service in the Florentine republic informs Zuckert's interpretation of The Prince and Discourses on Livy in the first half of her book.
Although supported by his father-in-law, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, Alessandro faced complex external and internal challenges, including enemy conspirators, republicans' plots to restore the Florentine Republic, and intrigues from family members and supporters.
In this regards, in the following we offer a review of the historical examples--indicating that Italy (Florentine Republic) of Machiavelli's time, regarding the attributes of PD and UA was somewhat similar to today as described by Hofstede (2015).
One politician, among many, Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527, politician and philosopher of the Renaissance period, stood out for his cunning thinking during the Florentine Republic (present-day Italy).
Then, recognizing his precocious talent, Lorenzo de' Medici (Lorenzo the Magnificent), effectively the leader of the Florentine Republic, took Michelangelo into his household, where the boy was exposed to the company of leading humanists such as Marsilio Ficino, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, and Poliziano.
As the Medici began to take control of the Florentine Republic, the Ming rulers already had sovereignty over some 85 million people.
Scholars accept Giorgio Vasari's assertion (Lives of the Artists, 1550 and 1568) that Michelangelo was commissioned to do this work by Bartolomeo Valori who, in 1530, governed Florence for the Medici after they defeated the Florentine Republic and returned to power.
The emphasis is on the development of Machiavelli's ideas as he interacted with the Florentine Republic during his lifetime, beginning in 1494, when he started work as a government clerk.
Early in a young Machiavelli's reign as chancellor of the Florentine Republic, his astute ability to tactfully persuade functionaries to do his bidding becomes apparent.
At the start of the 16th century, Florence's leaders commissioned Leonardo, then at the height of his career, to paint a massive fresco celebrating the Florentine Republic's victory over the Milanese in a battle on the plains of Anghiari that took place on June 29, 1440.
This collection of sixteen essays covers most aspects of his life and work: his relation with the Medici, his work as a civil servant, his place in the Florentine republic from 1494-1512, his major works (The Prince, Discourses on Livy, The Art of War, and Florentine Histories), the importance of Rome, his treatment of philosophy, religion, poetry, rhetoric, ethics, and the theatre, his 'afterlife and reputation', and his place in the growth of political thought.
Then, she documents a lifelong infatuation with Epicureanism and Lucretius on the part of Bartolomeo Scala, who served as chancellor of the Florentine Republic from 1465 to the time of his death in 1497.