Flowering rush


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a European rushlike plant (Butomus umbellatus), with an umbel of rosy blossoms.
See under Flowering.

See also: Flowering, Rush

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Occasionally intertwined with hardstem rushes are plants such as flowering rush, reed canary grass, river bulrush, and wild rice.
Mewn gwrthgyferbyniad i'r pelenllys gronynnog, planhigyn mawr hardd blodeuog fel mae ei enw'n awgrymu ydi'r frwynen flodeuog (Butomus umbellatus; Flowering rush) ac mae hwn eto wedi gwneud yn arbennig o dda eleni.
There are plenty of suitable plants, such as yellow iris (Iris pseudacorus), the flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus) and pontderia, a pickerel weed with cylindrical spikes of blue flowers.
There are plenty of suitable plants, such as yellow iris (Iris pseudacorus), the flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus) and pontderia, the pickerel weed, which has cylindrical spikes of blue flowers.
Gorgeous irises, kingcups - in full yellow flower now - and reeds and rushes galore including butomus, the flowering rush, which isn't actually a rush at all.
I've got hardy ferns, blue oat grass, flowering rush, golden sedge and creeping jenny.
Start with the vertical lines of miniature cattail (Typha minima) and flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus), which will produce umbels of pink flowers to complement the cattail foliage.
Marginal plants, such as cannas, flowering rush, Japanese iris, and papyrus, grow in boggy soil at pond's edge or very shallow water (underwater shelves give you a place to set these plants).