fluorescence

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fluorescence

the emission of radiation during exposure to light or X rays
Not to be confused with:
florescence – act, state, or period of flowering; bloom
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

fluo·res·cence

 (flo͝o-rĕs′əns, flô-, flō-)
n.
1. The emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued.
2. The property of emitting such radiation.
3. The radiation so emitted.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fluorescence

(ˌflʊəˈrɛsəns)
n
1. (General Physics) physics
a. the emission of light or other radiation from atoms or molecules that are bombarded by particles, such as electrons, or by radiation from a separate source. The bombarding radiation produces excited atoms, molecules, or ions and these emit photons as they fall back to the ground state
b. such an emission of photons that ceases as soon as the bombarding radiation is discontinued
c. such an emission of photons for which the average lifetime of the excited atoms and molecules is less than about 10–8 seconds
2. (General Physics) the radiation emitted as a result of fluorescence. Compare phosphorescence
[C19: fluor + -escence (as in opalescence)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fluo•res•cence

(flʊˈrɛs əns, flɔ-, floʊ-)

n.
1. the emission of radiation, esp. of visible light, by a substance during exposure to external radiation.
2. the property possessed by such a substance.
3. the radiation so produced.
[1852; fluor (spar) + (opal)escence]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fluo·res·cence

(flo͝o-rĕs′əns)
1. The giving off of light by a substance when it is exposed to electromagnetic radiation, such as visible light or x-rays. Light is emitted only as long as the electromagnetic radiation continues to bombard the substance. Compare phosphorescence.
2. The light produced in this way.
Did You Know? Have you ever stood in a room illuminated by a "black light" and wondered why your white T-shirt, your shoelaces, and your teeth appear to glow? These objects appear so bright under ultraviolet light because they contain fluorescent materials that absorb the black light's ultraviolet rays (which are not visible to the human eye) and re-emit some of their energy as visible light. Therefore, these objects give off more visible light than is being shone on them, seemingly making something out of nothing. Many fabric whiteners leave fluorescent pigments behind in treated clothes; the clothes then look very bright because they absorb ultraviolet light from the environment and emit some of the absorbed energy as visible light.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fluorescence

The emission of light from an object which has been irradiated by light or other radiations. Energy is absorbed by the object and then re-radiated at a longer wavelength than the incident light.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fluorescence - light emitted during absorption of radiation of some other (invisible) wavelength
autofluorescence - self-induced fluorescence
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
phosphorescence - a fluorescence that persists after the bombarding radiation has ceased
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إسْتِشْعاع، فَلْوَرَه
fluorescence
fluorescens
fluoreszkálás
flúrljóm
fluorescencia
florışıma

fluorescence

[flʊəˈresns] Nfluorescencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

fluorescence

[ˌflʊəˈrɛsəns] nfluorescence f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

fluorescence

nFluoreszenz f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

fluorescence

[ˌflʊəˈrɛsns] nfluorescenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

fluorescent

(fluəˈresnt) adjective
giving off a certain kind of light. fluorescent light; fluorescent paint.
fluoˈrescence noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

fluor·es·cence

n. fluorescencia, propiedad de emisión de luminosidad de ciertas sustancias cuando son expuestas a cierto tipo de radiación, tal como los rayos-x.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
So, scientists at North Carolina State University determined the impact of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting and fluorescent light exposure on aroma-active compounds in vitamin premixes.
In fact, he had collected their pots, which were included alongside his fluorescent light installations in this exhibition, framed as a group show of three key figures of the postwar avant-garde.
Interior Design Studio 200 has been installed with fluorescent lamp unit and the classroom is covered by curtains, whereas Studio 100 contains the presence of both fluorescent light and daylighting.
Compared to traditional fluorescent light fittings, the eLLK/M 92, LED 400/800 series of LED light fittings reduce energy costs by up to 20 percent.
Fluorescent light bulbs are hard to place on the Kelvin scale because of the way they work, using mercury vapor and phosphors to emit light.
United States-based Larson Electronics has launched a powerful, explosion proof fluorescent emergency light, called the HALP-EMG-48-2L-T5HO Class 1 Division 2 Emergency Fluorescent Light.
Washington, December 4 ( ANI ): That annoying buzz created by overhead fluorescent light bulbs in your office may not bother you again, as scientists at Wake Forest University have developed a flicker-free, shatterproof alternative for large-scale lighting.
The test produces a fluorescent light when biomarkers are present in the samples.
ISLAMABAD, November 16, 2011 (Frontier Star): The electricity consumers could save as many as Rs.1,700 per bulb if they use fluorescent light (10 hours a day) instead of using a normal incandescent bulb without compromising on illumination.
There is an LED replacement now for an incandescent lamp, the cost is high, but you know, 15-30 years ago, the cost for replacing incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs was around $7 per fluorescent light bulb, now it's like $1.
Typically a fluorescent bulb, including compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs), known as energy-efficient bulbs, and high intensity discharge (HID) bulbs used for streetlights, floodlights or car parks contain between 3.5 to 15 milligrams of mercury.

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