flywheel

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fly·wheel

 (flī′wēl′, -hwēl′)
n.
1. A heavy-rimmed rotating wheel used to minimize variations in angular velocity and revolutions per minute, as in a machine subject to fluctuation in drive and load.
2. An analogous device, especially one used to regulate the speed of clockwork.

flywheel

(ˈflaɪˌwiːl)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a heavy wheel that stores kinetic energy and smooths the operation of a reciprocating engine by maintaining a constant speed of rotation over the whole cycle

fly•wheel

(ˈflaɪˌʰwil, -ˌwil)

n.
a heavy disk or wheel rotating on a shaft so that its momentum gives almost uniform rotational speed to the shaft and to all connected machinery.
[1775–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.flywheel - regulator consisting of a heavy wheel that stores kinetic energy and smooths the operation of a reciprocating engineflywheel - regulator consisting of a heavy wheel that stores kinetic energy and smooths the operation of a reciprocating engine
fluid flywheel - a kind of fluid coupling in which the flywheel is the driving rotor
governor, regulator - a control that maintains a steady speed in a machine (as by controlling the supply of fuel)
Translations

flywheel

[ˈflaɪwiːl] N (Tech) → volante m

flywheel

[ˈflaɪˌwiːl] n (Tech) → volano
References in periodicals archive ?
This Watford sheller does not utilize a standard single large flywheel. Instead, it incorporates two small identical flywheels of approximately 16 inches in diameter to store inertia for the shelling process.
According to a news release, Brillion, which has secured approximately $14 million in annualized new business to date in 2016 from a variety of markets, was "named a strategic source of machined flywheels to Detroit in North America" and will begin production of the components in the second half of 2016.
He believed flywheels could be used to hold vast quantities of renewable energy, helping to combat global warming by making the generating of renewable energy more affordable.
Flywheels can be viewed as kinetic or mechanical batteries; they use electric motors to accelerate a rotor (flywheel) to a very high speed, which stores the energy in mechanical/rotational form.
After the MRI suite at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children (TSRHC) completely shut down twice due to power problems, the leading orthopedic center in Dallas installed a pair of VYCON flywheels to avoid similar situations in the future.
High-inertia flywheels mean fewer power peaks, so the engine consistently operates at optimum speed, lowering fuel consumption by as much as 25-30 percent.
One of the most reliable approaches of compensation is combined flywheels energy storage system (FESS) [3], installed close to the wind power generating units and hydraulic or pumped storage power plant, controlled by the automatic generation control (AGC) system.
Instead of a pump delivering hydraulic oil to a cylinder, the RapidFire uses a pair of 75-pound cast-iron flywheels. Flipping a lever engages a rack-and-pinion gear mechanism, harnessing the inertia of the flywheels to push the log forward into the stationary wedge, cleaving the wood.
The Flywheels also produced Large gyroscopic forces that made steering difficult.
Flywheels have a very efficient way of working to store energy in which there is virtually no loss.