fetus

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Related to Foetuses: fetal stage, fetuses

fe·tus

 (fē′təs)
n. pl. fe·tus·es
1. The unborn young of a viviparous vertebrate having a basic structural resemblance to the adult animal.
2. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after conception to the moment of birth, as distinguished from the earlier embryo.

[Middle English, from Latin fētus, offspring; see dhē(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

fetus

(ˈfiːtəs) or

foetus

n, pl -tuses
(Biology) the embryo of a mammal in the later stages of development, when it shows all the main recognizable features of the mature animal, esp a human embryo from the end of the second month of pregnancy until birth. Compare embryo2
[C14: from Latin: offspring, brood]

fe•tus

(ˈfi təs)

n., pl. -tus•es.
(used chiefly of viviparous mammals) the young of an animal in the womb or egg, esp. in the later stages of development, in humans being after the end of the second month of gestation.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin fētus bringing forth of young]

fe·tus

(fē′təs)
The unborn young of a mammal at the later stages of its development, especially a human embryo from its eighth week of development to its birth.

fetal adjective

fetus

- A human embryo starts to be called a fetus at nine weeks.
See also related terms for months.

fetus

An unborn mammal from when its adult features become recognizable. In humans, this is in the ninth week of development.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fetus - an unborn or unhatched vertebrate in the later stages of development showing the main recognizable features of the mature animalfetus - an unborn or unhatched vertebrate in the later stages of development showing the main recognizable features of the mature animal
teras, monster - (medicine) a grossly malformed and usually nonviable fetus
abortus - a human fetus whose weight is less than 0.5 kilogram when removed or expelled from the mother's body
craniate, vertebrate - animals having a bony or cartilaginous skeleton with a segmented spinal column and a large brain enclosed in a skull or cranium
ductus arteriosus - a blood vessel in a fetus that bypasses pulmonary circulation by connecting the pulmonary artery directly to the ascending aorta; normally closes at birth
umbilical, umbilical cord - membranous duct connecting the fetus with the placenta
baby - an unborn child; a human fetus; "I felt healthy and very feminine carrying the baby"; "it was great to feel my baby moving about inside"

fetus

foetus
noun embryo, unborn child, fertilized egg The fetus can see, hear, experience and taste.
Translations
plod
foster
sikiö
fetus
janin
fóstur
胎児
태아
foetus
făt
фетус
foster
ทารกในครรภ์
bào thai

foetus

(American) fetus (ˈfiːtəs) noun
a young human being, animal, bird etc in the early stages of development before it is born or hatched.
ˈfoetal , (American) ˈfetal adjective
of a foetus. in a foetal position.

fetus

جَنِيـن plod foster Fötus έμβρυο feto sikiö fœtus fetus feto 胎児 태아 foetus foster płód feto плод foster ทารกในครรภ์ cenin bào thai 胎儿

fe·tus

n. feto, embrión en desarrollo, fase de la gestación desde los tres meses hasta el parto.

fetus

n feto
References in periodicals archive ?
(3,4) The number of foetuses in foetu is usually single; however, multiple foetuses in foetu have been reported.
Accordingly there is pressure on the Veterinary clinician to indicate the viability of foetuses, incidence of twinning, probable postoperative complications etc.
It showed that foetuses are more likely to show left-handed movements in the womb when their mothers are under pressure.
The present study was conducted on mammary glands of 27 buffalo foetuses. The foetuses of different gestational age were obtained from pregnant nondescript buffaloes slaughtered at Gazipur Slaughter House, New Delhi, and Veterinary Clinical Complex, GADVASU, Ludhiana.
In response to these two kinds of research, we investigated a coarse-grained multifractal analysis of the foetal heart rate in order to discriminate healthy from distressed foetuses.
The prevalence of this condition is observed in 3-10% of the born foetuses, but it varies in different populations; 4-8% in developed countries to 6-30% in the developing countries.3,4 Several maternal, foetal and placental factors have been identified in IUGR, including chromosome and foetal structural abnormalities and infections (foetal factors); placenta separation, foundling placenta and placenta thrombosis (placental factors); thrombophlebitis and connective tissue diseases, hypertension and maternal chronic diseases (maternal factors).5,6 IUGR is associated with foetal and maternal mor tality.
Dead foetuses younger than 20 weeks are disposed of as medical waste.
Washington, November 22 ( ANI ): While some researchers have suggested that foetuses yawn, others have disagreed and claim it is simple mouth opening.
Another report--even more disturbing, if that were possible--regarded researchers in the Netherlands and Israel who have removed immature ovaries from four-month-old foetuses which they hope to stimulate through further stages of growth in test tubes until they can extract fully mature eggs to use in the creation of new human life.
Liverpool's Alder Hey children's hospital was embroiled in a fresh scandal yesterday as medical authorities admitted they were storing up to 400 foetuses.
RESULT: OBSERVATION: All foetuses exposed to 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15 & 20mg/kg/day AgNPs group were evaluated for signs of body malformation and were compared with all foetuses of anionic double distilled water treated sham control group.