folk magic

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folk magic

n.
The practice of using charms, spells, or rituals to attempt to control natural or chance events or to influence the behavior or emotions of others.
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Umbanda has been described as a Brazilian folk religion combining elements of Macumba, Roman Catholicism and South American Indian practices.
They further explain, "This is not a time for local dieties or any of the other elements of folk religion.
In her chapter on spirituality at camp, furthermore, Rothenberg makes insightful connections between the concepts of folk religion and CBF's specific "camp religion," characterized as pluralistic or, in her words, "Reconformadox," a mixture of Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox Judaism (4).
But still, none of these works are quite what they appear to be, namely, spontaneous outbursts of expressionist invention inspired by art brut and folk religion.
This included a posting of a further five years in Hong Kong before finally retiring to continue - then fulltime - his life-long study of the cults and iconography of Chinese folk religion.
Unfortunately, folk religion is barely touched upon in this section, with a preference for the Great Tradition in Asian religions.
In contrast, the burgeoning international ethnographic literature on Cuban folk religion tends toward studies that are sometimes so grounded in one particular locale, domain of practice, and theoretical issue that they can seem myopic.
Santa Muerte expert Andrew Chesnut, professor of religious studies at Virginia Commonwealth University and author of Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, the Skeleton Saint, calls the Mexican folk religion "the fastest-growing new religious movement in the Americas," with more than 10 million followers.
Its place in Jewish lore is rooted in classical Judaism and Jewish folk religion dating to the Bible, the Talmud and rabbinic Midrash.
National Christians viewed the new, foreign Savior through themes of eschatology and messianism present in their folk religion.
Alevism is closely related to BektaE-ism and folk religion; commonalities include the veneration of Haci BektaE- Veli, a 13-century saint of BektaE-ism and folk religion from what is now Iran.
In folk religion and folklore, trees are often said to be the homes of tree spirits.