folklore

(redirected from Folklorists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

folk·lore

 (fōk′lôr′)
n.
1. The traditional beliefs, myths, tales, and practices of a people, transmitted orally.
2. The comparative study of folk knowledge and culture. Also called folkloristics.
3.
a. A body of widely accepted but usually spurious notions about a place, group, or institution: Rumors of their antics became part of the folklore of Hollywood.
b. A popular but unfounded belief.

folk′lor′ic adj.
folk′lor′ish adj.
folk′lor′ist n.
folk′lor·is′tic adj.

folklore

(ˈfəʊkˌlɔː)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the unwritten literature of a people as expressed in folk tales, proverbs, riddles, songs, etc
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the body of stories and legends attached to a particular place, group, activity, etc: Hollywood folklore; rugby folklore.
3. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the anthropological discipline concerned with the study of folkloric materials
ˈfolkˌloric adj
ˈfolkˌlorist n, adj
ˌfolklorˈistic adj

folk•lore

(ˈfoʊkˌlɔr, -ˌloʊr)

n.
1. the traditional beliefs, legends, customs, etc., of a people; lore of a people.
2. the study of such lore.
3. a body of widely held but false or unsubstantiated beliefs.
[1846; coined by English antiquary William John Thoms (1803–85)]
folk′lor`ic, adj.
folk′lor`ist, n.
folk`lor•is′tic, adj.

folklore

the study of the traditions of a particular people in custom, song, story, belief, etc. — folklorist, n.
See also: Mankind

folklore

The traditional beliefs, legends, or stories passed by word of mouth within a society.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culturefolklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
lycanthropy - (folklore) the magical ability of a person to assume the characteristics of a wolf
lore, traditional knowledge - knowledge gained through tradition or anecdote; "early peoples passed on plant and animal lore through legend"
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
ogre - (folklore) a giant who likes to eat human beings
troll - (Scandanavian folklore) a supernatural creature (either a dwarf or a giant) that is supposed to live in caves or in the mountains
elf, gremlin, imp, pixie, pixy, hob, brownie - (folklore) fairies that are somewhat mischievous
dibbuk, dybbuk - (Jewish folklore) a demon that enters the body of a living person and controls that body's behavior
goblin, hob, hobgoblin - (folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature that makes trouble for human beings
kelpie, kelpy - (Scottish folklore) water spirit in the form of a horse that likes to drown its riders
lamia, vampire - (folklore) a corpse that rises at night to drink the blood of the living
banshee, banshie - (Irish folklore) a female spirit who wails to warn of impending death
Oberson - (Middle Ages) the king of the fairies and husband of Titania in medieval folklore
Titania - (Middle Ages) the queen of the fairies in medieval folklore
peri - (Persian folklore) a supernatural being descended from fallen angels and excluded from paradise until penance is done
golem - (Jewish folklore) an artificially created human being that is given life by supernatural means

folklore

noun
A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
Translations
عادات الشَّعْب وَتقاليدُه، فولكلورفُولكلور
folklór
folklorefolkeminder
kansanperinne
folklor
folklór
òjóîfræîi
民間伝承
전설
folklór
folkloristik
เรื่องราวประเพณีและความเชื่อของผู้คน
văn hóa dân gian

folklore

[ˈfəʊklɔːʳ] Nfolklore m

folklore

[ˈfəʊklɔːr] nfolklore mfolk medicine nmédecine f traditionnellefolk music n (traditional)musique f folklorique; (contemporary)musique f folkfolk singer n (traditional)chanteur/euse m/f de chansons folkloriques; (contemporary)chanteur/euse m/f folk invfolk song folksong [ˈfəʊksɒŋ] n (traditional)chanson f folklorique; (contemporary)chanson f folk inv

folklore

[ˈfəʊkˌlɔːʳ] nfolclore m

folk

(fouk) noun plural
(especially American folks) people. The folk in this town are very friendly.
adjective
(of the traditions) of the common people of a country. folk customs; folk dance; folk music.
folks noun plural
one's family. My folks all live nearby.
ˈfolklore noun
the study of the customs, beliefs, stories, traditions etc of a particular people. the folklore of the American Indians.

folklore

فُولكلور folklór folklore Folklore λαϊκή παράδοση folclor, folclore kansanperinne folklore folklor folclore 民間伝承 전설 folklore folklore folklor folclore фольклор folkloristik เรื่องราวประเพณีและความเชื่อของผู้คน folklor văn hóa dân gian 民间传说
References in periodicals archive ?
So when folklorists call a cultural form traditional, we mean simply that it's a form that is passed on, through the informal folk network of person-to-person communication.
She also met research scholars, folklorists, Folk singers and linguists.
It will be of interest to folklorists, cultural historians, and folk song enthusiasts.
During the 1920s and 1930s, anthropologists and folklorists became obsessed with uncovering connections between African Americans and their African roots.
Panel presentations highlighted both graduate student work, as well as the important work of community advocates and public folklorists.
To proceed, I first review the conditions and dialogues that prompted Ben-Amos and other folklorists to undergird their action-oriented study with a definition that would announce their analytical concerns for a transformative age.
Reflecting on the disciplinary future of folklore in the age of the Internet, Blank recalls that many senior folklorists were initially reluctant to do ethnography online since they believed that oral expression of folklore is its most authentic manifestation.
In the third piece, Judy McKinty examines the question of string games; these were documented by nineteenth-century folklorists and McKinty's article offers a useful insight into developing approaches to investigation by folklorists.
Other folklorists, including Earl Clifton Beck, Richard Dorson, Bruno Nettl, and Ivan Walton, contributed fieldwork.
Before the 1880s, most folklorists collected and studied narrative songs to the neglect of shorter vernacular lyrics, and many academics in the twentieth century maintained that rather narrow perspective.
The contributors are scholars of Judaism, folklorists mostly from Israel.
How were German folklorists Jakob and Wilhelm better known?