foo dog


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foo dog

 (fo͞o)
n.
A stylized figure of a lion, traditionally placed as a symbolic guardian at the entrance to a Chinese temple or other building.

[Perhaps from Mandarin , Buddha (from Middle Chinese fɦut, Buddha, from late Old Chinese *but, Buddha, from Sanskrit buddhaḥ, Buddha; see Buddha2) or from Mandarin , good fortune (from Middle Chinese fuwk), dog (from the stylized lion's doglike appearance ).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the ancient Chinese Art, this is a wide range of images of celestial guardian mythical dog-lion (Foo Dog) in carpet art, painting and sculpture, as well as modern clay dog the traditional fishery of Huaiyang.
In the sculpture, two mythical phoenixes battle it out in the trees as a guardian lion or "Foo Dog" snarls at the two from below.
Plus my family have a Mega Foo Dog to decorate as a fun take away project (Google it!).
Dubai Men's College alumnus Mohammed Abedin created The Foo Dog, a company that supplies eight-inch vinyl dolls to artists, painters and customizers.
Dubai Emirati urban art maker Foo Dog has steered away from the conventional, introducing fully customisable vinyl dolls to the UAE.
The Far Eastern theme is continued in eye-catching sculptural work, including a rare bronze statue of Buddha, imported in 1900, Japanese deer and the fabulous bronze Foo Dog, resting its great paws on a multi-coloured cloisonn enamel globe.
A talisman such as a Chinese foo dog may work better for an older child.
The walking excursion begins with the exploration of Chinatown, land-marked by the famous red archway and Foo Dog icons.
A Foo Dog dating back to the T'ang Dynasty was the inspiration for this porcelain model, pounds 145, by Halcyon Days, orderline 0800 515 925 or www.halcyondays.co.uk
The Spitz group has many variations including larger types such as the Alaskan Husky and Japanese Akita, as well as Finnish and German varieties, through to the exotic Karelian Bear Dog, Chinese Foo Dog and Japanese Shiba Inu, which looks like a fox.
There are also affinities in the two artists' palettes: Phelan favors moody, elusive, indistinct hues like the grays of Books and Flowers, 2000, the subdued blues of Mount Tacoma Tulips in a Chinese Vase III, 1999, or the earth tones of Murillo Roses in Fulper Vase with Foo Dog, 1998--colors that would not feel out of place in Marden's work of the '60s.
Throughout Asia, especially in China, good fortune can often be found in the paws of Imperial Garden lions, also called foo dogs.