famine

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fam·ine

 (făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. A drastic shortage; a dearth.
3. Severe hunger; starvation.
4. Archaic Extreme appetite.

[Middle English, from Old French, from faim, hunger, from Latin famēs.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

famine

(ˈfæmɪn)
n
1. a severe shortage of food, as through crop failure or overpopulation
2. acute shortage of anything
3. violent hunger
[C14: from Old French, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin famēs hunger]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fam•ine

(ˈfæm ɪn)

n.
1. extreme and general scarcity of food, esp. within a large geographical area.
2. any extreme scarcity.
3. Archaic. starvation.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, derivative of faim hunger (< Latin famēs)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

famine

, famish - Famine and famish come from Latin fames, "hunger."
See also related terms for hunger.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.famine - an acute insufficiencyfamine - an acute insufficiency    
deficiency, lack, want - the state of needing something that is absent or unavailable; "there is a serious lack of insight into the problem"; "water is the critical deficiency in desert regions"; "for want of a nail the shoe was lost"
2.famine - a severe shortage of food (as through crop failure) resulting in violent hunger and starvation and death
calamity, catastrophe, tragedy, disaster, cataclysm - an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; "the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity"; "the earthquake was a disaster"
the Great Calamity, the Great Hunger, the Great Starvation, the Irish Famine - a famine in Ireland resulting from a potato blight; between 1846 and 1851 a million people starved to death and 1.6 million emigrated (most to America)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

famine

noun hunger, want, starvation, deprivation, scarcity, dearth, destitution refugees trapped by war, drought and famine
Quotations
"They that die by famine die by inches" [Matthew Henry Expositions on the Old and New Testament]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
مَجاعَةنَقْص، مَجاعَه، جوع
hladomor
hungersnødsult
nälänhätä
glad
éhínség
hallæri
飢饉
기근
badas
bads
hladomor
lakota
hungersnöd
ความขาดแคลนอาหาร
nạn đói

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
A. N (= hunger) → hambruna f; (= shortage) → escasez f
B. CPD famine relief Nayuda f contra el hambre
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

famine

[ˈfæmɪn]
nfamine f
modif
famine relief → aide f aux victimes de la famine
famine victim → victime f de la famine
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

famine

n (lit)Hungersnot f; (fig)Knappheit f; to die of famineverhungern
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

famine

[ˈfæmɪn] ncarestia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

famine

(ˈfӕmin) noun
(a) great lack or shortage especially of food. Some parts of the world suffer regularly from famine.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

famine

مَجاعَة hladomor hungersnød Hungersnot λιμός hambruna nälänhätä famine glad carestia 飢饉 기근 hongersnood hungersnød głód fome, penúria голод hungersnöd ความขาดแคลนอาหาร kıtlık nạn đói 饥荒
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

famine

n. hambre, carestía.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
No fewer than 113 million people experienced high levels of food insecurity in the world's most severe food crises in 2018.
The network seeks to combat food crises from humanitarian and development perspectives and tackle the root causes of these crises, and its members include the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Food Programme (WFP), and the European Union (EU).
The worst food crises in 2018 were, in order of severity, in Yemen, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, the Syrian Arab Republic, the Sudan, South Sudan and northern Nigeria.
(TAP) - Food crises will affect tens of millions of people across the world this year, researchers warned on Tuesday, after war, extreme weather and economic woes in 2018 left more than 113 million in dire need of help.
Release of global report on food crises in Brussels BRUSSELS, April 2 (KUNA) -- A Global Report, presented jointly by European Union, UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and UN World Food Programme (WFP), shows that around 113 million people in 53 countries experienced acute food insecurity in 2018, compared to 124 million in 2017.
Climate change and climate variability are some of the significant famine agents that result in the food crises. Communities living in arid and semi-arid areas, who happen to be mostly pastoralists, are the primary victims of food insecurity.
Around 108 million people in 48 food crisis-affected countries are still at risk or in severe acute food insecurity in 2016 (According to the Global Report on Food Crises 2017).
LAHORE -- There is a dire need for increasing agricultural yields through 'EcoFarming' to avoid the expected food crises, said Shah Faisal Afridi, President PakChina Joint Chamber of Commerce and Industry (PCJCCI) while introducing the Chinese Cultivation Model of 'EcoFarming'
The minister discussed how the current global food crises resulting from either natural factors such as desertification, drought, inadequate rainfall or human elements such as political conflicts, armed disputes and growing populations require strategic food stocking strategies from the Arab community.
In an echo of past global food crises, concerns about potentially fatal spikes in the cost of food and hoarding by suppliers is again emerging.
An era of food crises reminiscent of the 1960s and 1970s seemed to return in 2008, requiring methods of delivering aid and support quickly.