footman

(redirected from Footmen)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Footmen: footman

foot·man

 (fo͝ot′mən)
n.
1. A man employed as a servant to wait at table, attend the door, and run various errands, as in a palace.
2. Archaic
a. A foot soldier; an infantryman.
b. One who travels on foot; a pedestrian.

footman

(ˈfʊtmən)
n, pl -men
1. a male servant, esp one in livery
2. (Furniture) a low four-legged metal stand used in a fireplace for utensils, etc
3. (Military) (formerly) a foot soldier
4. (Zoology) any of several arctiid moths related to the tiger moths, esp the common footman (Eilema lurideola), with yellowish hind wings and brown forewings with a yellow front stripe; they produce woolly bear larvae

foot•man

(ˈfʊt mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. a liveried household servant.
2. Archaic. an infantryman.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.footman - a man employed as a servant in a large establishment (as a palace) to run errands and do choresfootman - a man employed as a servant in a large establishment (as a palace) to run errands and do chores
manservant - a man servant
Translations
خادِم المَنْزِل
lokaj
tjener
òjónn
lokaj
üniformalı uşak

footman

[ˈfʊtmən] N (footmen (pl)) → lacayo m

footman

[ˈfʊtmən] nvalet m de pied

footman

[ˈfʊtmən] n (-men (pl)) → lacchè m inv

foot

(fut) plural feet (fiːt) noun
1. the part of the leg on which a person or animal stands or walks. My feet are very sore from walking so far.
2. the lower part of anything. at the foot of the hill.
3. (plural often foot ; often abbreviated to ft when written) a measure of length equal to twelve inches (30.48 cm). He is five feet/foot six inches tall; a four-foot wall.
ˈfooting noun
1. balance. It was difficult to keep his footing on the narrow path.
2. foundation. The business is now on a firm footing.
ˈfootball noun
1. a game played by kicking a large ball. The children played football; (also adjective) a football fan.
2. the ball used in this game.
ˈfoothill noun
a small hill at the foot of a mountain. the foothills of the Alps.
ˈfoothold noun
a place to put one's feet when climbing. to find footholds on the slippery rock.
ˈfootlight noun
(in a theatre) a light which shines on the actors etc from the front of the stage.
ˈfootmanplural ˈfootmen noun
a male servant wearing a uniform. The footman opened the door.
ˈfootmark noun
a footprint. He left dirty footmarks.
ˈfootnote noun
a note at the bottom of a page. The footnotes referred to other chapters of the book.
ˈfootpath noun
a path or way for walking, not for cars, bicycles etc. You can go by the footpath.
ˈfootprint noun
the mark or impression of a foot. She followed his footprints through the snow.
ˈfootsore adjective
with painful feet from too much walking. He arrived, tired and footsore.
ˈfootstep noun
the sound of a foot. She heard his footsteps on the stairs.
ˈfootwear noun
boots, shoes, slippers etc. He always buys expensive footwear.
follow in someone's footsteps
to do the same as someone has done before one. When he joined the police force he was following in his father's footsteps.
foot the bill
to be the person who pays the bill.
on foot
walking. She arrived at the house on foot.
put one's foot down
to be firm about something. I put my foot down and refused.
put one's foot in it
to say or do something stupid. I really put my foot in it when I asked about his wife – she had just run away with his friend!
References in classic literature ?
It was opened by another footman in livery, with a round face, and large eyes like a frog; and both footmen, Alice noticed, had powdered hair that curled all over their heads.
All the rooms of the summer villa were full of porters, gardeners, and footmen going to and fro carrying out things.
Two footmen, the princess' and his own, stood holding a shawl and a cloak, waiting for the conversation to finish.
I made off with this little booty to Ipswich, and from thence to Harwich, where I went into an inn, as if I had newly arrived from Holland, not doubting but I should make some purchase among the foreigners that came on shore there; but I found them generally empty of things of value, except what was in their portmanteaux and Dutch hampers, which were generally guarded by footmen; however, I fairly got one of their portmanteaux one evening out of the chamber where the gentleman lay, the footman being fast asleep on the bed, and I suppose very drunk.
One instance of this was, his greatly magnifying the fortune of his companion, as he called Jones: such is a general custom with all servants among strangers, as none of them would willingly be thought the attendant on a beggar: for, the higher the situation of the master is, the higher consequently is that of the man in his own opinion; the truth of which observation appears from the behaviour of all the footmen of the nobility.
But, though title and fortune communicate a splendor all around them, and the footmen of men of quality and of estate think themselves entitled to a part of that respect which is paid to the quality and estate of their masters, it is clearly otherwise with regard to virtue and understanding.
Writer Brian Hoey wrote in his book "(https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12962346-not-in-front-of-the-corgis) Not In Front of the Corgis " that the future queen consort gave her footmen strict instructions when it comes to her and Prince Charles' home.
The listing stated that the mansion needed a butler, gardener, house manager, lady's maid, chauffeur, chef, three housekeepers and three footmen.
Summary: The first-year student at the University of St Andrew on the east coast of Scotland will have a house manager, three housekeepers, a gardener, a lady's maid and a butler on hand to help her, along with three footmen, a private chef and chauffeur
But when Harry and Meghan parade through Windsor one of these footmen will be armed.
The procession will look similar to Prince Edward's 1999 nuptials, with two footmen sitting behind the couple in their carriage.