eviction

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e·vict

 (ĭ-vĭkt′)
tr.v. e·vict·ed, e·vict·ing, e·victs
1. To put out (a tenant, for example) from a property by legal process; expel.
2. To force out; eject: "U.S. troops defeated and evicted the Spanish from the Philippines" (Robert D. Richardson).

[Middle English evicten, from Latin ēvincere, ēvict-, to vanquish : ē-, ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + vincere, to defeat; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

e·vict·ee′ (ĭ-vĭk-tē′, ĭ-vĭk′tē) n.
e·vic′tion n.
e·vic′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eviction - action by a landlord that compels a tenant to leave the premises (as by rendering the premises unfit for occupancy); no physical expulsion or legal process is involved
coercion, compulsion - using force to cause something to occur; "though pressed into rugby under compulsion I began to enjoy the game"; "they didn't have to use coercion"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.eviction - the expulsion of someone (such as a tenant) from the possession of land by process of law
due process, due process of law - (law) the administration of justice according to established rules and principles; based on the principle that a person cannot be deprived of life or liberty or property without appropriate legal procedures and safeguards
ouster - a wrongful dispossession
actual eviction - the physical ouster of a tenant from the leased premises; the tenant is relieved of any further duty to pay rent
retaliatory eviction - an eviction in reprisal for the tenant's good-faith complaints against the landlord; illegal in many states
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

eviction

noun expulsion, removal, clearance, ouster (Law), ejection, dispossession, dislodgement He was facing eviction for non-payment of rent.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

eviction

noun
The act of ejecting or the state of being ejected:
Slang: boot, bounce.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إخْراج، إخْلاء، طَرْد
udsættelse
kilakoltatás
útburîur
súdne vysťahovanie
tahliye etme/edilme

eviction

[ɪˈvɪkʃən]
A. Ndesahucio m, desalojo m
B. CPD eviction notice Naviso m de desalojo
eviction order Norden f de desalojo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

eviction

[ɪˈvɪkʃən] nexpulsion feviction notice npréavis m d'expulsioneviction order narrêté m d'expulsion
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

eviction

nAusweisung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

eviction

[ɪˈvɪkʃn] nsfratto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

evict

(iˈvikt) verb
to put out from house or land especially by force of law.
eˈviction (-ʃən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
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