Fordism


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Fordism

the theory of Henry Ford stating that production efficiency is dependent on successful assembly-line methods.
See also: Economics
Translations
fordisme
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References in periodicals archive ?
Seven chapters with conclusion are: the invention of the factory; New England textiles and visions of Utopia; industrial exhibitions, steelmaking, and the price of prometheanism; Fordism, labor, and the romance of the giant factory; crash industrialization in the Soviet Union; Cold War mass production; giant factories in China and Vietnam.
The factory and the dance floor, Fordism and fetishism, play and werk, collapse into undifferentiated opalescence.
"Fordism" meant that workers had to be rich enough to buy a car from his factories.
So, they turn to Fordism. In 1914, Henry Ford of the Ford Motor Company famously doubled his workers' wages to five dollars a day so they could afford to buy the cars they were producing.
Dearborn strengthened due to "Fordism," and other places around the country soon adopted the concept.
This book covers not only the technical aspects (mechanization, power sources, new materials, interchangeable parts, electricity, automation), but organizational innovations (division of labor, Fordism, Talyorism, Lean).
The Henry Fordism of cheddar production in many ways anticipated the advent of industrial agriculture.
In the The Modern Prince and Americanism and Fordism (as edited by Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell Smith) Gramsci discusses how institutions inherited from previous epochs always play an integral part in forming the terrain of any political struggle.
Fordism" talks about the modern standardization of mass production and mass consumption.
This revelation resonates diachronically as well, as Breu suggests that the base-superstructure dynamic also organizes the relationship between early twentieth-century Fordism and late twentieth-century post-Fordism.