foreclose

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fore·close

 (fôr-klōz′)
v. fore·closed, fore·clos·ing, fore·clos·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To enforce (a lien, deed of trust, or mortgage) in whatever manner is provided for by law.
b. To bring a suit to prevent a mortgagor from redeeming (a property) by paying any outstanding debt.
2. To exclude or rule out; bar.
3. To settle or resolve beforehand.
v.intr.
To enforce a lien, deed of trust, or mortgage as permitted by law: The bank foreclosed on the property.

[Middle English forclosen, to exclude from an inheritance, from Old French forclos, shut out, past participle of forclore, to exclude : fors-, outside (from Latin forīs; see dhwer- in Indo-European roots) + clore, to close (from Latin claudere).]

fore·clos′a·ble adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

foreclose

(fɔːˈkləʊz)
vb
1. (Law) law to deprive (a mortgagor, etc) of the right to redeem (a mortgage or pledge)
2. (tr) to shut out; bar
3. (tr) to prevent or hinder
4. (tr) to answer or settle (an obligation, promise, etc) in advance
5. (tr) to make an exclusive claim to
[C15: from Old French forclore, from for- out + clore to close, from Latin claudere]
foreˈclosable adj
foreclosure n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fore•close

(fɔrˈkloʊz, foʊr-)

v. -closed, -clos•ing. v.t.
1.
a. to deprive (a mortgagor) of the right to redeem a property, esp. after defaulting on mortgage payments.
b. to subject (a property) to foreclosure.
c. to take away the right to redeem (a mortgage).
2. to shut out; exclude.
3. to hinder or prevent; preclude; forbid.
4. to establish an exclusive claim to.
5. to close, settle, or answer beforehand.
v.i.
6. to foreclose a mortgage.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French forclore to exclude =for- out + clore to shut (Latin claudere)]
fore•clos′a•ble, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

foreclose


Past participle: foreclosed
Gerund: foreclosing

Imperative
foreclose
foreclose
Present
I foreclose
you foreclose
he/she/it forecloses
we foreclose
you foreclose
they foreclose
Preterite
I foreclosed
you foreclosed
he/she/it foreclosed
we foreclosed
you foreclosed
they foreclosed
Present Continuous
I am foreclosing
you are foreclosing
he/she/it is foreclosing
we are foreclosing
you are foreclosing
they are foreclosing
Present Perfect
I have foreclosed
you have foreclosed
he/she/it has foreclosed
we have foreclosed
you have foreclosed
they have foreclosed
Past Continuous
I was foreclosing
you were foreclosing
he/she/it was foreclosing
we were foreclosing
you were foreclosing
they were foreclosing
Past Perfect
I had foreclosed
you had foreclosed
he/she/it had foreclosed
we had foreclosed
you had foreclosed
they had foreclosed
Future
I will foreclose
you will foreclose
he/she/it will foreclose
we will foreclose
you will foreclose
they will foreclose
Future Perfect
I will have foreclosed
you will have foreclosed
he/she/it will have foreclosed
we will have foreclosed
you will have foreclosed
they will have foreclosed
Future Continuous
I will be foreclosing
you will be foreclosing
he/she/it will be foreclosing
we will be foreclosing
you will be foreclosing
they will be foreclosing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been foreclosing
you have been foreclosing
he/she/it has been foreclosing
we have been foreclosing
you have been foreclosing
they have been foreclosing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been foreclosing
you will have been foreclosing
he/she/it will have been foreclosing
we will have been foreclosing
you will have been foreclosing
they will have been foreclosing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been foreclosing
you had been foreclosing
he/she/it had been foreclosing
we had been foreclosing
you had been foreclosing
they had been foreclosing
Conditional
I would foreclose
you would foreclose
he/she/it would foreclose
we would foreclose
you would foreclose
they would foreclose
Past Conditional
I would have foreclosed
you would have foreclosed
he/she/it would have foreclosed
we would have foreclosed
you would have foreclosed
they would have foreclosed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.foreclose - keep from happening or arising; make impossible; "My sense of tact forbids an honest answer"; "Your role in the projects precludes your involvement in the competitive project"
make unnecessary, save - make unnecessary an expenditure or effort; "This will save money"; "I'll save you the trouble"; "This will save you a lot of time"
deflect, fend off, forefend, forfend, head off, avert, stave off, ward off, avoid, debar, obviate - prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening; "Let's avoid a confrontation"; "head off a confrontation"; "avert a strike"
blockade, obstruct, stymie, stymy, embarrass, hinder, block - hinder or prevent the progress or accomplishment of; "His brother blocked him at every turn"
frustrate, scotch, thwart, foil, baffle, bilk, cross, spoil - hinder or prevent (the efforts, plans, or desires) of; "What ultimately frustrated every challenger was Ruth's amazing September surge"; "foil your opponent"
kibosh, stop, block, halt - stop from happening or developing; "Block his election"; "Halt the process"
2.foreclose - subject to foreclosing procedures; take away the right of mortgagors to redeem their mortgage
reclaim, repossess - claim back
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

foreclose

[fɔːˈkləʊz] (Jur)
A. VT [+ mortgage] → extinguir el derecho de redimir
B. VIextinguir el derecho de redimir una/la hipoteca
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

foreclose

[fɔːrˈkləʊz] vt
to foreclose on → saisir
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

foreclose

vt loan, mortgagekündigen
vi to foreclose on a loan/mortgageein Darlehen/eine Hypothek kündigen; to foreclose on somebodyjds Kredit/Hypothek kündigen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

foreclose

[fɔːˈkləʊz] vt (Law) (also foreclose on) → pignorare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
There are deeds of trust, mortgages, certificates of release, transfers, judgments, foreclosures, writs of attachment, orders of sale, tax liens, petitions for letters of administration, and decrees of distribution.
There were no foreclosures of mortgages, no protested notes, no bills payable, no debts of honour in Typee; no unreasonable tailors and shoemakers perversely bent on being paid; no duns of any description and battery attorneys, to foment discord, backing their clients up to a quarrel, and then knocking their heads together; no poor relations, everlastingly occupying the spare bed-chamber, and diminishing the elbow room at the family table; no destitute widows with their children starving on the cold charities of the world; no beggars; no debtors' prisons; no proud and hard-hearted nabobs in Typee; or to sum up all in one word--no Money!
I did not appear but through this agent I forced the foreclosure, and but few days (no more, believe me, than the law allowed) were given John Claverhouse to remove his goods and chattels from the premises.
You must remember that the first mortgage comes in for the first claim after taxes, and if the foreclosure doesn't bring enough to satisfy more than that, the second mortgage is sleeping on its rights."
Back in Q3 2016, Queens accounted for almost half of new foreclosure cases in NYC, however, foreclosures in 3Q dropped 26% quarter-over-quarter and settled in at 288 cases.
So where are foreclosures, which were the cause or a major contributing factor to the downturn of the aforementioned markets and the epicenter of the Great Recession?
Foreclosures continued to fall to pre-recession levels in June as the economy continued to strengthen, but signs have emerged that the market might be in danger of overheating, according to a RealtyTrac report released Thursday.
Even so, foreclosures kicked up in oil-dependent states during last year's final quarter.
The business slowdown around Thanksgiving contributed to a typical decline in foreclosures from October to November in the 24 Oregon counties, according to Eugene-based Gorilla Capital.
All told, there have been 436 foreclosures filed for the first quarter of 2015, almost a third below last year's pace.
In "Losing a Home to Mortgage Foreclosure," Prohaska and Lichtenstein suggest that foreclosures are not a temporary setback, but are instead related to chronic experiences of financial-related stress.
BANKING AND CREDIT NEWS-July 10, 2014--US completed foreclosures for May total 47,000