forensic

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Related to Forensic anthropology: forensic psychology

fo·ren·sic

 (fə-rĕn′sĭk, -zĭk)
adj.
1. Relating to, used in, or appropriate for courts of law or for public discussion or argumentation.
2. Relating to the use of science or technology in the investigation and establishment of facts or evidence in a court of law: a forensic laboratory.

[From Latin forēnsis, public, of a forum, from forum, forum; see dhwer- in Indo-European roots.]

fo·ren′si·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

forensic

(fəˈrɛnsɪk)
adj
(Law) relating to, used in, or connected with a court of law: forensic science.
[C17: from Latin forēnsis public, from forum]
forensicality n
foˈrensically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fo•ren•sic

(fəˈrɛn sɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to or used in courts of law or in public debate.
2. adapted or suited to argumentation; rhetorical.
3. of, pertaining to, or involved with forensic medicine or forensic anthropology: forensic laboratories.
n.
4. forensics, the art or study of argumentation and formal debate.
5. forensics, a department of forensic medicine, as in a police laboratory.
(used with a sing. v.)
[1650–60; < Latin forēns(is) of, belonging to the forum, public (see forum)]
fo•ren`si•cal′i•ty (-ˈkæl ɪ ti) n.
fo•ren′si•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

forensic

Belonging to or used in a court of law.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.forensic - of, relating to, or used in public debate or argument
rhetorical - given to rhetoric, emphasizing style at the expense of thought; "mere rhetorical frippery"
2.forensic - used or applied in the investigation and establishment of facts or evidence in a court of law; "forensic photograph"; "forensic ballistics"
applied - concerned with concrete problems or data rather than with fundamental principles; "applied physics"; "applied psychology"; "technical problems in medicine, engineering, economics and other applied disciplines"- Sidney Hook
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قَضائي، شَرْعي
soudní
retslig
oikeuslääketieteellinenrikostekninen
törvényszéki
réttarlæknisfræîi
弁論の法医学の法廷の討論の
teismo
tiesas-tiesu-
kryminalistycznyoratorskisądowy
adlî

forensic

[fəˈrensɪk] ADJforense; [medicine] → legal, forense
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

forensic

[fəˈrɛnsɪk] adj [skill] → de juriste
forensic expert → expert(e) médico-légal(e)forensic evidence npreuves fpl relevées lors d'une expertise médicolégale
to be convicted on forensic evidence → être reconnu coupable sur la base du rapport médico-légalforensic medicine nmédecine f légaleforensic scientist nmédecin m légiste
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

forensic

adj
evidence, test, laboratoryforensisch; (Med) → gerichtsmedizinisch
(form) skillforensisch

forensic

:
forensic expert
n (Police) → Spurensicherungsexperte m/-expertin f
forensic medicine
nGerichtsmedizin f, → forensische Medizin

forensic

:
forensic science
nKriminaltechnik f; forensic laboratorykriminaltechnisches Labor
forensic scientist
nKriminaltechniker(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

forensic

[fəˈrɛnsɪk] adj (evidence, laboratory) → medico-legale
forensic scientist or expert → esperto/a della (polizia) scientifica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

forensic

(fəˈrensik) adjective
of or concerning courts of law. forensic medicine.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

fo·ren·sic

a. forense, rel. a asuntos legales;
___ laboratorylaboratorio ___;
___ medicinemedicina legal;
___ physicianmédico ___
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

forensic

adj forense
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gabriela Mroz, 22, from Poland, who is studying for an MA in forensic anthropology, told the Examiner: "Friends from work have said I can stay with them." She said she hopes the university will provide alternative accommodation.
Dr Borrini moved from Italy to Liverpool in 2013, to take up the post of principal lecturer in forensic anthropology at John Moores University, But out of hours he is known as The Great Borrini - Gentleman of Mystery...
This special issue of Forensic Anthropology is another contribution to a growing literature aimed at solving what may be the most vexing problem in human identification: large-scale commingling of human remains.
FORENSIC anthropology can now help to identifying the living too.
In this quirky buddy flick, which follows our heroes on a road trip to the University of Tennessee's Forensic Anthropology Center -- a real place that is colloquially known as the Body Farm for its outdoor laboratory featuring decomposing corpses -- Albert is less of a consultant than an extraordinarily patient therapist, with a touch of friend thrown in.
Last year, Richard Jantz, director of the University of Tennessee's Forensic Anthropology Center, re-examined data from those remains, concluding in a study in Forensic Anthropology that these bones could have belonged to a tall woman and were "likely those of Amelia Earhart." He argues that Earhart, who stood at five-feet-seven inches, is more similar to the Nikumaroro bones than 99 percent of individuals in a large reference sample.
She finished her course of Bachelor of Science in Anthropology minor in Geography with a focus on biological anthropology and emphasis on Forensic Anthropology at the Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas, USA.
Forensic anthropology. International Journal of Legal Medicine 2007;121(6):431-2.
The ICMP's program in Bosnia and Herzegovina provides assistance in forensic anthropology and archaeology, DNA matching and identification, and civil society development.
The students - all third years - visited the Odyssey Field School in Limassol and spent a week learning more about Forensic Anthropology through hands-on work with skeletal remains.
Speaking of why she opted for a skull, Kenzie said: "I study forensic anthropology and would love to have a job in crime scene investigation.

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