forerunner

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fore·run·ner

 (fôr′rŭn′ər)
n.
1.
a. One that precedes, as in time; a predecessor.
b. An ancestor; a forebear.
2.
a. One that comes before and indicates the approach of another; a harbinger.
b. A warning sign or symptom.
3. One who skis a course before the beginning of a race.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

forerunner

(ˈfɔːˌrʌnə)
n
1. a person or thing that precedes another; precursor
2. a person or thing coming in advance to herald the arrival of someone or something; harbinger
3. an indication beforehand of something to follow; omen; portent
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fore•run•ner

(ˈfɔrˌrʌn ər, ˈfoʊr-, fɔrˈrʌn ər, foʊr-)

n.
1. predecessor; ancestor; precursor.
2. an omen or sign of something to follow; portent.
3. a person who appears in advance to announce the coming of someone or something else; herald; harbinger.
[1300–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forerunner - a person who goes before or announces the coming of another
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
predecessor - one who precedes you in time (as in holding a position or office)
2.forerunner - something that precedes and indicates the approach of something or someone
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"
3.forerunner - anything that precedes something similar in time; "phrenology was an antecedent of modern neuroscience"
temporal relation - a relation involving time
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

forerunner

noun
1. omen, sign, indication, token, premonition, portent, augury, prognostic, foretoken Some respiratory symptoms can be the forerunners of asthma.
2. precursor, predecessor, ancestor, prototype, forebear, harbinger, progenitor, herald the forerunners of those who were to support the Nazis
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

forerunner

noun
1. One that precedes, as in time:
2. A phenomenon that serves as a sign or warning of some future good or evil:
Idiom: writing on the wall.
3. One that indicates or announces someone or something to come:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
السابِق، المُمَهِّد، المُبَشِّر بِمَجيء
předzvěst
forgængerforløber
elõhírnök
fyrirrennari
praecursor
pirmtakas
priekšgājējspriekštecis

forerunner

[ˈfɔːˌrʌnəʳ] Nprecursor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

forerunner

[ˈfɔːrrʌnər] n (= person) → précurseur m (= thing) → ancêtre m
to be the forerunner of sth [thing] → être l'ancêtre de qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

forerunner

n (= precursor)Vorläufer m; a forerunner of things to comeein Vorbote mder Zukunft
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

forerunner

[ˈfɔːˌrʌnəʳ] nprecursore m; (Skiing) → apripista m/f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

forerunner

(ˈfoːranə) noun
a person or thing which is a sign of what is to follow. Penicillin was the forerunner of modern antibiotics.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
They are the companions and forerunners of such saintship.
Perfect calms at sea are always suspected by the experienced mariner to be the forerunners of a storm, and I know some persons, who, without being generally the devotees of superstition, are apt to apprehend that great and unusual peace or tranquillity will be attended with its opposite.
He drew from his breast the diamond cross and the star of the Garter which she had sent him by those generous Frenchmen; he kissed it, and then, as he reflected, that she would never again see those things till he lay cold and mutilated in the tomb, there passed over him one of those icy shivers which may be called forerunners of death.
The water was rising higher and higher, and the gusts, forerunners of a steady breeze, were growing stiffer and stiffer.
Some thought that their once brilliant friend was in an incipient stage of insanity, of which his passionate impulses had perhaps been the forerunners; others prognosticated a general blight and gradual decline.
The idea of the story had suggested itself to him, we are told, before he had finished its immediate forerunner, "The Last of the Mohicans." He chose entirely new scenes for it, "resolved to cross the Mississippi and wander over the desolate wastes of the remote Western prairies." He had been taking every chance that came of making a personal acquaintance with the Indian chiefs of the western tribes who were to be encountered about this period on their way in the frequent Indian embassies to Washington.
He had begun to romp with them in a feeble, awkward way, and even to squabble, his little throat vibrating with a queer rasping noise (the forerunner of the growl), as he worked himself into a passion.
But his teaching never quite died, for by giving the English people the Bible Wyclif left a lasting mark on England; and although the Reformation did not come until two hundred years later, he may be looked upon as its forerunner.
It seemed like the forerunner of something absolutely serious, which she did not wish.
This terrible spectacle was the forerunner of the series of maritime catastrophes that the Nautilus was destined to meet with in its route.
"It will be the forerunner also of other interesting events: your sister's marriage, and your taking orders."
It was a warm evening for the time of year, and even in those gray streets of South London there was the languor of February; nature is restless then after the long winter months, growing things awake from their sleep, and there is a rustle in the earth, a forerunner of spring, as it resumes its eternal activities.