foreseeability


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foreseeability

(fɔːˌsiːəˈbɪlətɪ)
n
the ability to foresee
References in periodicals archive ?
Draper III, in an argument framed as a concurrence in two opinions and a dissent in a third, argued that the foreseeability test automatically would bar recovery for all co-employee liability because it is always foreseeable workplace accidents will occur.
its ultimate outcomes will clarify the foundations of the international legal system, Reduce normative conflict, And provide greater legal certainty and foreseeability in all international law-related interactions.
Whether the PCP is liable may turn on the issue of foreseeability, and an immediate referral to a psychiatrist would have been a more prudent course of action.
The results showed that with increasing severity of depression, a specific hindsight bias pattern emerged - exaggerated foreseeability and inevitability of negative (but not positive) event outcomes, as well as a tendency to misremember initial expectations in line with negative outcomes.
3) This duty is determined by the relationship of the parties and the foreseeability of the harm.
37) The foreseeability of the harm factor tends to carry great weight.
While there may be situations in which household members are in contact with toxins brought home on clothing, a refined analysis for particularized risk, foreseeability, and fairness requires a case-by-case assessment in toxic-tort settings.
Latin terminology, foreseeability and lawfulness, while doubtless of legal significance, have little to do with where medicine meets the law, as opposed to the law meeting medicine.
I welcome this dialogue because the foreseeability of third-party crimes is an important issue affecting a large number of practitioners and clients throughout the state.
Additionally, another case involving foreseeability will be explored.
Although the rules themselves have been around for a long time, academic attention to the theory of information-forcing rules originated among economically oriented scholars examining what is now one of the most thoroughly debated contract doctrines--the foreseeability limitation on consequential damages.