rumen

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ru·men

 (ro͞o′mən)
n. pl. ru·mi·na (-mə-nə) or ru·mens
The first division of the stomach of a ruminant animal, in which most food collects immediately after being swallowed and from which it is later returned to the mouth as cud for thorough chewing. Also called paunch.

[Latin rūmen; akin to Sanskrit romantha-, ruminant, chewing the cud.]

ru′mi·nal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rumen

(ˈruːmɛn)
n, pl -mens or -mina (-mɪnə)
(Zoology) the first compartment of the stomach of ruminants, behind the reticulum, in which food is partly digested before being regurgitated as cud
[C18: from Latin: throat, gullet]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ru•men

(ˈru mɪn)

n., pl. -mi•na (-mə nə)
1. the first stomach of a ruminant, in which food is softened and then regurgitated for cud-chewing.
2. the cud of a ruminant.
[1720–30; < Latin rūmen]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ru·men

(ro͞o′mən)
The first and largest division of the stomach in ruminant animals, in which the food is fermented by microorganisms. See more at ruminant.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rumen - the first compartment of the stomach of a ruminant; here food is collected and returned to the mouth as cud for chewing
ruminant - any of various cud-chewing hoofed mammals having a stomach divided into four (occasionally three) compartments
stomach, tum, tummy, breadbasket - an enlarged and muscular saclike organ of the alimentary canal; the principal organ of digestion
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Ruminants have evolved a special digestive compartment, the so-called forestomach, in which symbiotic microbes produce essential enzymes that are needed to degrade plant material before it enters the true stomach (Soest 1994).
TQ inhibited DNA synthesis, proliferation, and viability of cancerous prostate epithelial cells by down-regulating androgen receptors and E2F-1, a regulator of cell proliferation and viability, without affecting the noncancerous cells (34), inhibited benzo(a)pyrene (BP)induced forestomach carcinogenesis (35), prevented MCA-induced fibrosarcoma tumours (36), and blocked tumour angiogenesis in a xenograft human prostate cancer in mice (37).
Absence of full-length Brcal sensitizes mice to oxidative stress and carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in the esophagus and forestomach. Carcinogenesis 2007; 28: 1401-7.
Mouse forestomach carcinoma cells immunosuppress macrophages through TGF-[beta]1.
Neel and Edwards (1968) reported forestomach disorders in 72.15 percent of 52 cases in ruminants.
Ruminant metabolism differs from that of other animals and man with regard to the forestomach system (anaerobic conditions) and specific contribution of microorganisms, e.g., to cellulose degradation as reported by Czerkawski and Breckenridge (1977).
The left gastrointestinal tract consisted of two noncontinuous segments, one comprised of a blind-ended esophagus and a second section of gut consisting of a dilated segment of forestomach with duodenum.
Mouse forestomach carcinoma (MFC) were purchased from the cell bank of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
[22] reported that glandular gastrectomy, leaving the forestomach almost intact, did not induce significant body weight loss or reduced food intake from third week after surgery.
Conney, "Inhibitory effects of dietary curcumin on forestomach, duodenal, and colon carcinogenesis in mice," Cancer Research, vol.
Wright, "Molecular analysis of methanogenic archaea in the forestomach of the alpaca (Vicugna pacos)," BMC Microbiology, vol.