forktail


Also found in: Wikipedia.

forktail

(ˈfɔːkˌteɪl)
n
(Animals) a name used for various fish and bird species having a forked tail
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Balasubramanian, "Breeding behaviour and nest tree use by Indian Grey Hornbill Ocyceros birostris in the Eastern Ghats, India," Forktail, no.
Lei, "Results of a survey for waterbirds in the lower Yangtze floodplain, China, in January-February 2004," Forktail, vol.
Forktail catfish, Arius graeffei, was the dominant bycatch (47% of the total and 5.0-10.0 cm TL), followed by glassfish, Ambassis jacksoniensis and A.
One Ishnura verticalis, eastern forktail, was observed in a small pond at the Children's Garden at Garfield Park Conservatory.
After over-wintering beneath the ice--where some nymphs actively fed and grew, while others, and some eggs, were in diapause (dormancy) --the first species to typically emerge from the aquatic realm is the hardy but dainty damselfly, known as the eastern forktail. Common here, it keeps a low profile, inhabiting dense vegetation near water, gleaning small insects and avoiding predators.
Described by an international team of researchers in the August Forktail, Orthotomus chaktomuk takes its name from a Khmer word meaning "four faces," a reference to the rivers that converge to form an "X" shape at Phnom Penh.
The discovery of the bird, also known as Orthotomus chaktomuk, was announced in a special online edition of the Oriental Bird Club's journal Forktail, the statement said.
Costs of sexual interactions to females in Rambur's forktail damselfly, Ischnura ramburi (Zygoptera: Coenagrionidae).
Each patrician is associated with a forest animal or plant, like deer, forktail, or civet, whose consumption clan members avoid.
They describe the find in the Oriental Bird Club journal, Forktail.
A description of the new species is published in the July issue of the Oriental Bird Club's journal Forktail.